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Power supply

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by masoud, Sep 4, 2014.

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  1. masoud

    masoud

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    Sep 4, 2014
    Hi guys
    I'm new to this website and I hope that I can be helpful here .
    I want to repair a power supply which designed for HP printers but I can not find any resource about output connector . It has many output and I need to know what are they . This power makes many output voltages some of them in this case work well but the others does not work . I would be thankful if you help me .
    thank you
    model : delta dps-386ap-1
    image : http://www.getthatpart.com/shop42/image.php?type=T&id=102254
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,765
    1,920
    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there masoud
    welcome to Electronics Point Forums :)

    without seeing a bit more of the PSU, its a bit difficult to give any advice

    how about some closeup VERY SHARP and well lit pics around the output cable/connector areas on the PCB'

    Dave
     
    masoud likes this.
  3. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
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    Nov 28, 2011
    Hi masoud and welcome to Electronics Point :)

    If you don't know what the output voltages are supposed to be, how do you know that some of the outputs "work well" and others don't work?

    Is the board manufactured by Hewlett Packard? Or is it made by another company and supplied by Hewlett Packard? Or is it a third party product?

    Have you inspected the board for signs of faulty electrolytics? (Bulging, leaking etc)

    As Dave said, please upload some good pictures of your board (not the photo of the brand new board that you linked to).
     
    masoud likes this.
  4. masoud

    masoud

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    Sep 4, 2014
    actually this power supply was made by Delta for HP printers .
    For each wire there is a text on the board that said how much voltage should I suppose from that wire .
    I checked any components that I could ( like mosfets , Diodes , etc) .
    here are some more pictures of this smps
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 4, 2014
  5. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
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    Nov 28, 2011
    So what's the problem? Are some of the voltages wrong?

    You said you need to know the pin descriptions for the connector. Why?

    Do you want to use this power supply with an HP printer but when you plug it in, the printer doesn't work?

    Have you made a list of the voltages the power supply is supposed to produce, and the voltages you measure on those outputs? Do you know which voltage(s) are wrong and causing the printer to fail to work?

    Have you inspected the board for signs of faulty electrolytics? (Bulging, leaking etc)
     
  6. masoud

    masoud

    3
    0
    Sep 4, 2014
    Actually the board consist of two parts . One of them makes low voltages like 3.3v and 5v ( this part work well ) but the other part makes voltages like 24v and 36v and this part does not work ( the output of this part is 0v ) . When I connect the supply to printer the error appear on the screen which said 24v is not correct . I though that maybe there is some pin which can enable the output but I couldn't find the pin descriptions .
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2014
  7. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
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    Nov 28, 2011
    OK, now we have some idea of what the problem is.

    That's quite a large and complicated power supply.

    So the 3.3V and 5V rails are OK, but all of the others are zero?

    If there's an enable signal from the printer, it's possible the fault is on the printer, not on the power supply. Can you try swapping in another power supply or another printer to find out where the problem is?

    How many output connectors are there? Is there just the one 12x2 connector or is there another?

    Make a list of the connector pins. Note the wire colours. Follow each wire to the board and note down the text marked on the board where the wire connects. See if you can identify as many pins as possible as either 0V or 3.3V or 5V or some other voltage, using the markings on the circuit board. Post the list, and any other information you have.

    We're going to need some better pictures. Start with closeups of both sides of the board in the area that generates the higher voltage outputs.
     
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