Connect with us

Power supply help?

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Crumpets, Nov 15, 2016.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Crumpets

    Crumpets

    3
    0
    Nov 15, 2016
    So I'm looking to power a coin hopper for dispensing uh... coins!

    my question's are,

    Is it a 12v power supply If so are there any you could recommend? (Lower prices desirable).

    These are the manufacture's specs:
    12Vdc – 24 Vdc (±10%)
    Start up current 3 A ± 20%
    Standby current 50 mA ± 5%
    Coin pay out current 450 mA ± 20%

    Thank you!

    s-l1600.jpg
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,498
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    I'd recommend a 12v to 24v power supply rated at more than 3A
     
  3. Crumpets

    Crumpets

    3
    0
    Nov 15, 2016
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,498
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    That would probably be fine. Note that you have to do mains wiring to use this power supply. Not the best idea for a Newby.
     
  5. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    That supply puts out both 12V and 24V. You do not need that. Just get one that has 12V and 3A or more. You should be able to find one that looks like a laptop brick supply, no mains wiring required.

    Bob
     
    (*steve*) likes this.
  6. tedstruk

    tedstruk

    475
    7
    Jan 7, 2012
    All the power supplies I have read(every one of them) have been delivering a different value than what they have written on them. I even bought a multi-volt Radio Shack unit that was a click off(that is-- the 1,5v setting was sendind 3, the 9v was sending 13v and the 12v was sending 15v... sure don't want to overpower anything huh.
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    You are probably looking at an unregulated supply and measuring the voltage with no load. These will read high.

    Regulated supplies deliver the same voltage over a wide range of currents up to the max rated current.

    Typically, the 5V wall warts I have tested deliver within 100mV of 5V.

    Bob
     
    davenn likes this.
  8. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    121
    Apr 9, 2014
    I'm thinking maybe one such as this one. You can simply clip off the connector on the end and save it for future projects. It is rated for 12vdc 3A. Or you can opt for the higher current model, 5A. Note that is does not come with a mains power cord. You may have one of them laying around anyway.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-3A-5A...hash=item43f278aaa1:m:m_npNEC0L_6d65RoECcf1nQ

    You could also purchase these to eliminate having to cut the cord.
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2Pcs-CCTV...399630?hash=item43e1c20c8e:g:a3MAAOSwQiRUm9nR
     
  9. Crumpets

    Crumpets

    3
    0
    Nov 15, 2016
    Thank you Bigone! This is the simple solution I was looking for. Thank you for taking the time to grab examples of what I would need. I'm a complete newbie when it comes to power, and it scares me!

    Thank you

    Edit: I just found a power pack capable in house so all I need is the 99p adapter and I don't have to ruin anyone's power pack.

    Thanks
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-