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power sensors

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by [email protected], Feb 14, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I was just wondering why RF power sensors designed for power meters
    are so much more
    expensive than integrated circuits that measure RF power. The former
    seem to be several thousand dollars while the latter seem to be
    several dollars. Any information is appreciated.

    Thank you.
     

  2. Show me an IC that will measure 500 watts of broadband RF, and can
    meet the required metrology requirements.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  3. jasen

    jasen Guest

    LT1088: 2% at 100 Mhz - you'll need to shunt most of those watts.

    it may be possible to add a compensation network and get even better
    performance,

    Bye.
    Jasen
     

  4. First of all, you can't "Use a shunt" for RF power measurements. You
    have to use a power attenuator if the sensor has a 50 ohm input. If its
    high impedance, you use a voltage divider after the termination, but it
    still isn't a certified power sensor. Without a specific calibration
    procedure and being certified by a metrology lab with traceable
    references, its only a hobby grade toy.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
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