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Power on off indicator?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by weatherjack, Apr 21, 2013.

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  1. weatherjack

    weatherjack

    15
    0
    Dec 9, 2011
    This should be simply but I am drawing a blank on this? I am building a project that has 24v input and 24v output. I have a toggle switch I want to use to turn the power on and off. I also have a green LED (on) and a red LED (off). When the power is on I have a push button switch to allow 24v to output. So I plug in the 24v input, toggle swich is off, red light is on, push button will not work, 24v does not go to output. I plug in 24v, turn the toggle switch to on, the green LED will light up, push button switch sends 24v to output. This should be so simple I have been away from electronics for some time and now getting back into things. I just simply cannot figure this out? If I get this problem worked out I will share the final project with pictures.
     

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  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,007
    2,506
    Nov 17, 2011
    You use a double-pole dual throw switch (DPDT). This is actually like two switches (a and b) in one housing).
    Connect GND from input to output.
    Connect + from input to both center taps of the switch (thar would be pin 2 n your diagram, only you'll have 2 such pins on a DPDT switch).
    Connect the Red and green LEDs to the outer positions of one of the switches (e.g. a) such that they light up as required by the on and off position of the switch.
    Connect one pin of the pushbutton to switch b of the DPDT switch. Connect it to the outer pin that corresponds to the on-position (nect to the wire leading to the green LED).
    Lastly, wire the second pin of the pushbutton to the + pin of the output.
     
  3. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    Yeah thinking on this?? This powers the LED either way switch is set. Then the power is sent through with the position it is in. Let me make a drawing of this and will post. I may be over thinking this? Hint on final project>> electro-mechanical. Thanks for the reply! The double throw is what I should have gone with to begin. I am currently set up with a RShack 275-0652 an SPDT switch.
     
  4. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    Ok Should be one of these. #1 or #2? Thanks again. BTW uploading photo to correct size is a PITB!
     

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  5. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    better pic?
     

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    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    1,920
    Sep 5, 2009
    #1 looks great

    #2 no good as you are not supplying negative power rail to the LED's


    not sure what you mean by that ? do you mean resizing or compressing?

    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,475
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    The red led and the green LED will need the appropriate resistor in series with them or they will stop working (perhaps with a bang) almost as soon as power is applied.

    In the tutorial section there is a long post about LEDs. In that there is an explanation as well as links to calculators which can tell you what value resistor to use.
     
  8. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    Got the picture posting figured out. #1 is the way I am going to wire this. I did not show resisters in the last drawing just to make it simple. O yeah another hint In this project I will also be using H180-4E1-PSL. Here the latest pics.
     

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  9. XxAdvancingTechxX

    XxAdvancingTechxX

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    Apr 22, 2013
    That wire seems kind of small for 24v. Maybe that's just me.
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,475
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    24V s not so high a voltage that you need extra thick insulation.

    The wire (conductor) size is determined by the current it needs to carry, not the voltage.
     
  11. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    picture update
     

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  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,475
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Looks like it works.

    I would recommend some insulation to prevent those connections from shorting out with others when they're stuffed into the box.

    Most often I use heatshrink tubing, but insulation tape will work for a while...
     
  13. weatherjack

    weatherjack

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    Dec 9, 2011
    Completed! Works great. I am running it at 60psi and it will crush a can roughly to 1 1/2 inches. Next maybe a can counter? Any ideas or suggestions? Thanks for all of the replies.
     

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  14. weatherjack

    weatherjack

    15
    0
    Dec 9, 2011
    No response? Any one like this?
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,475
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    That's pretty cool.

    Not sure why I didn't see your post yesterday.

    Got a photo of a crushed can?
     
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