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Power inductors with temperature sensor

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by acd, Jan 24, 2013.

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  1. acd

    acd Guest

    We are currently designing a compact, medium power buck converter and we would like to measure the temperature in the various components.
    The power stage includes temperature sensors, but for the inductors (around 40A,
    560nH) we did not find any with a temperature sensor.
    I would have thought that it should be easy to integrate a wire-based temp sensor.
    Since we use mostly closed-core inductors and the wire in the inductor is what gets hot, adding a temperature sensor to an existing product does not really make sense.

    Andreas
     
  2. Frank Miles

    Frank Miles Guest

    I've epoxied thermocouples to various devices as part of product testing.
    This is for development/testing, not production, right?
     
  3. Frank Miles

    Frank Miles Guest

    I've epoxied thermocouples to various devices as part of product testing.
    This is for development/testing, not production, right?
     
  4. acd

    acd Guest

    Am Donnerstag, 24. Januar 2013 17:02:19 UTC+1 schrieb cassiope:
    Yes, it is a research project.
    The problem is that I think the temperature of the coil will be much higher than that of the core, and we use closed-core inductors.
    How could I get a thermocouple inside the inductor?
    Of course, your solution is better than nothing, and we will probably do that.

    Andreas
     
  5. Guest

    I'd think the core and the coil would quickly reach the same
    temperature
    can't be much thermal isolation between coil and core

    but if you want t oget fancy something like this:
    http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20110156687

    and the Tc of copper

    -Lasse
     
  6. Nico Coesel

    Nico Coesel Guest

    Actually the core of the inductor gets hot due to losses in the core.
    The best thing to do is to calculate core and copper losses and see if
    the core doesn't get too hot if you design your own inductor.

    If you buy a readily made inductor the datasheet should tell you up to
    which temperature an inductor can be used at its rated current and how
    it should be derated at higher ambient temperatures.

    In both cases the temperature of the core should give you a rough
    estimate whether your calculations where right.
     
  7. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    Manufacturers of "closed core inductors" have a bad habit of providing no
    information whatsoever with regards to losses. At least some will provide
    information on request (in at least one series, Bourns uses Kool-Mu cores,
    from which I was able to establish the pertinent information).

    Tim
     
  8. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    For heavy machinery, it is not uncommon for an extra winding or two to
    be employed as a 'copper resistor'. If your coils are custom-wound,
    just add some fine wire (bifilar wound) in non-inductive winding
    (i.e. two matched windings in anti-series connection).

    It's also possible to get optic fiber thermometers so
    the pickup of electrical noise won't confuse the issue.
    I haven't used these, but know that some properties (time
    delay of ruby fluorescence) have well-known temperature
    effects.
     
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