Connect with us

Potentiometer replacement

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Roy S, Apr 1, 2018.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Roy S

    Roy S

    4
    0
    Apr 1, 2018
    I have 4 small b10k ohm dial pots soldered to a circuit board. (easily breakable).
    I want to attach 4 sliders pots also b10k ohm because they're more durable.
    Can I just solder wires from the slider pot posts to the rotary pot posts without actually removing the old rotary pots? I have uploaded a file for example.
    i have 44 of these to replace if someone can offer me the advice I need. I don't really want to UNsolder the old pots and resolver the slider pots because I'm not that good at soldering. But if I can just solder to the posts on the old pots I think I can handle that if this process works. Thank you in advance for any advice/help.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    No, you need to remove the wires from the original pots and move then to the new ones.
     
  3. Roy S

    Roy S

    4
    0
    Apr 1, 2018
    So if I snip off the old pots leaving their posts, I can solder the slider posts to the d pit posts, right? Thanks so much for your help
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, you could do that, but you would need to insulate them. Also, if the connections are being made with shielded wire you would be wise to use shielded wire to connect to the new pots.
     
  5. Roy S

    Roy S

    4
    0
    Apr 1, 2018
    Thank you. You've been extremely helpful. Very much appreciated. :):)
     
  6. dave9

    dave9

    1,092
    294
    Mar 5, 2017
    If you're frequently doing this sort of work, it would be helpful to get a hot air rework station. It would allow you to pull each (whole, all 3 legs) pot off in one motion. They've become quite affordable with entry level generics costing about $35 USD delivered on eBay.
     
  7. Roy S

    Roy S

    4
    0
    Apr 1, 2018
    I have a hot air gun. Gets quite hot. I'll try that on a test circuit. Thanks for the idea.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-