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Please identify this part.

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by Stefan, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Hi, I'm new to this forum and also new to electronics. A friend told me that i should replace this part on my PC graphic card (which started causing problems) before i throw it away and buy a new one.

    I know that I can just go to the store and tell them to give me exactly this, but I'm curious and I want to know what this part is :D I've noticed that the capacitors in a PC look exactly the same but the codes are different.

    Thanks in advance.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I would say it's a 330uF 16V electrolytic capacitor.

    However that doesn't tell the whole story. This may be a low ESR capacitor, or may have other characteristics.

    Why do you think it's faulty anyway?
     
  3. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,665
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    Jan 15, 2010
    The key is the manufacturer's logo.
    Yours is Fujitsu.
    Start looking for Fujisu data.
     
  4. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Thanks for the info guys. I don't know if its faulty btw, my friend mentioned that there are rare occasions when these parts can be faulty even if they arent showing it. So there are 5 x 1500uF 6.3V capacitors (replaced them with new ones) and the one i posted a jpg of.

    P.S I didint know that the "F" stands for manufacturer's logo, so I'll google for a Fujitsu database.
     
  5. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    And i googled for "Fujitsu solid capacitors"

    and found this out:

    The 'b' in this case indicates the series...which is RE/R7, meaning 7 mohms ESR.
    331 = 33 + 1x0
    330 uf
    16v

    thx again :D
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Here is the current data. However it doesn't list 851b...
     
  7. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    K now, can it be replaced with an electrolytic capacitor with the same values? Cause the store that im currently shopping from isnt that much specialized and they dont got solid state capacitors
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Is the capacitor rated for 105C and is it low ESR?

    If not then it will either fail very soon, or be worse than the one you removed. From what I can tell, the capacitor you removed had very impressive specs and are probably unlikely to be matched by a normal electrolytic -- even a low ESR cap.

    It is possible that this capacitor was used in a non-critical position where it's specs mean it's overrated, but this would also mean it's not highly stressed an unlikely to fail.

    You still haven't told us why you think it failed.

    Unlike normal electrolytics, these capacitors don't leak or dry out. I'm also not exactly sure how they do fail...

    edit: you probably want to read this page to see why you don't want to replace a solid polymer (not solid state) capacitor with a normal electrolytic.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  9. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    Here's how they fail :D

    [​IMG]

    I pulled these out of the same graphic card... and i know solid state are better than electrolytic. And since capacitors are extremely cheap, my friend suggested changing them all before throwing away the card...

    So I guess by pulling the impressive specs capacitor I messed it up :)
    Ah well... it wasnt working anyway xD

    edit: oh wait... i just read the link u posted... i guess these ARE just wet electrolytic... cause they got "K" on top :D (sorry, im new)
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    AHA! Those have very definitely failed.

    And I note that one of them may have gotten very warm too.

    Capacitors with the right specs may not be as cheap as you think, but they're not too expensive. If you can, I'd put the red labelled one back in. Do you remember which way around it went?
     
  11. Stefan

    Stefan

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    Aug 14, 2012
    yep... i'll put that one back in, and replace the others with new ones (since they are electorlytic).

    edit: the graphic card is working just fine :D i guess the obviously failed ones were the problem. thanks for everything!
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, an obvious failure like that can cause faults :)

    If the new capacitors you have are not good enough, you will find they will fail.

    They may swell up, or leak, or fail like the originals.

    If this happens, you'll need to replace them with better capacitors.
     
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