Connect with us

Please help me identify this capacitor!

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Darrin Smith, Jun 20, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Darrin Smith

    Darrin Smith Guest

    My VCR died recently. When I opened it up, I noticed that in the power
    supply, one of the caps leaked out and corroded a couple leads on two other
    small caps. These caps have only a 103 K or maybe f03 K (the first
    character looks more like a 1, but it might be an f) marked on it. No
    voltage or farrod reading....only the 103 K or f03 K can be seen.

    The first two characters (either 10 or f0) are underlined as is the K.

    The capacitor looks like it is ceramic, but it is not a disc. It is more of
    a square shape, and brown in color.

    I know this isn't much to go on, but I'd appreciate it if you could help me
    out here.

    Thanks!

    Darrin
     
  2. Darrin Smith

    Darrin Smith Guest

    Almost forgot...

    For what it is worth, the other caps in the power supply (a Farouda built
    one I think, for Sony) are rated at 105 degree C....if that helps out any!
     
  3. sofie

    sofie Guest

    103 = . 10,000pf = .01 uf
    the way the 103 works is:
    10 plus 3 zeros = 10,000
     
  4. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Darrin Smith" bravely wrote to "All" (20 Jun 04 00:38:58)
    --- on the heady topic of "Please help me identify this capacitor!"

    DS> From: "Darrin Smith" <>

    DS> My VCR died recently. When I opened it up, I noticed that in the
    DS> power supply, one of the caps leaked out and corroded a couple leads on
    DS> two other small caps. These caps have only a 103 K or maybe f03 K (the
    DS> first character looks more like a 1, but it might be an f) marked on
    DS> it. No voltage or farrod reading....only the 103 K or f03 K can be
    DS> seen.
    DS> The first two characters (either 10 or f0) are underlined as is the K.

    DS> The capacitor looks like it is ceramic, but it is not a disc. It is
    DS> more of a square shape, and brown in color.

    DS> I know this isn't much to go on, but I'd appreciate it if you could
    DS> help me out here.

    DS> Thanks!

    DS> Darrin

    Sure thing, the square caps are probably ceramic dipped types made for
    easy insertion. The 103 K is probably the correct markings. The letter
    K would indicate a 10% precision part and the 3 in 103 would represent
    the value multiplier. IOW 103 = 10000pF or 10nF or 0.01uF.
    Read the FAQ's.

    A*s*i*m*o*v

    .... If you don't know what leever "A" does then you better leever "B"
     
  5. mo

    mo Guest

    These power supplies are available for about $60 in Australia.
    That leaked fluid damaged more than you believe.
    Take my advice and pay the sixty.

    Cheers Darrin - Mo.
     
  6. Darrin Smith

    Darrin Smith Guest

    Thanks.

    Any idea what voltage it would be?
     
  7. Guest


    That's an overly pessimistic reply, considering you haven't seen the
    board in person, don't ya think? The description of 'corroded' could
    mean discolored, which can probably be ignored, or completely eaten
    through which means there may be damage to the traces as well.

    Really, this just calls for a good visual inspection for collateral
    damage and replacing any other damaged components. If any of the
    traces are damaged, you may want to add a wire in parallel if it
    carries any load.

    Why buy a $60 powersupply to repair a $60 VCR when it likely needs
    under $5 worth of parts?

    As for voltage rating, it depends on where in the circuit these are.
    If they are on the line side, they could see 340 volts peak, so I
    wouldn't go less than a 400v rating. On the vcr supply voltage side,
    the highest voltage Ive seen is 48 volts, so a 100-volt would be more
    than adequate. These small caps are probably there for filtering and
    don't see any significant current.

    -Chris
     
  8. Darrin

    Darrin Guest

    FWIW, I checked into getting a new power supply. The only one I found
    was $168!

    This came out of a Sony SLV-R5, so the VCR was pretty expensive (about
    $900 new...early SVHS), but today, you can get an SVHS for about the
    price of a new power supply!

    I think I'll buy the caps and try that first.
     
  9. mo

    mo Guest

    He said corroded.
    I automatically pictured the power supply of a sony SLV777.
    I've just spent hours and hours playing around with the mess that the
    leaking electro's guts caused.
    Takes a strong chemical to work its way through a ceramic capacitors
    legs.Ceramics aint got no fluid so I just can easily imagine what
    happened to other parts of his supply.
    Some people know things and other people know other things.Lifes like
    that.

    Cheers Mo.
     
  10. mo

    mo Guest

    He said corroded.
    I automatically pictured the power supply of a sony SLV777.
    I've just spent hours and hours playing around with the mess that the
    leaking electro's guts caused.
    Takes a strong chemical to work its way through a ceramic capacitors
    legs.Ceramics aint got no fluid so I just can easily imagine what
    happened to other parts of his supply.
    Some people know things and other people know other things.Lifes like
    that.

    Cheers Mo.
     
  11. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Darrin Smith" bravely wrote to "All" (20 Jun 04 16:36:54)
    --- on the heady topic of "Re: Please help me identify this capacitor!"

    DS> From: "Darrin Smith" <>

    DS> Any idea what voltage it would be?

    Any idea what the capacitors do?

    The answer really does depend on what they are being used for. If the
    capacitors are used as rectifier bypass then the voltage rating would
    need to be the same or better than the rectifier's Vrb. If they are
    used as a powerline RFI filter then they may need to be specially AC
    rated and able to withstand kilovolt spikes.

    .... Email returned to sender -- insufficient voltage.
     
  12. Guest


    I've never worked on that particular VCR myself, so I wasn't sure if
    this was a common problem that causes extensive collateral damage. I
    also wasn't real sure on his definition of corroded. I guess it was
    bad enough, he felt they needed replacing.

    I do have plenty of experience cleaning up the mess from leaky caps
    though. I agree that sometimes the damage is severe. For example I
    just threw out a few motherboards that had lots of trace damage due to
    leaky caps. Not worth the effort to fix those fine traces.

    -Chris
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-