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Plasma TV SCAM

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by Greysky, Jan 4, 2004.

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  1. Greysky

    Greysky Guest

    My cousin, who has more money than brains, was recently going to purchase a
    60 inch plasma TV for $18K. I told him the bad in 5 years the picture
    tube will be only half as bright, and that plasma tv' s only have a useful
    life of 10 years before the tube needs to be replaced. He bought a LCD TV
    instead. I wonder just how many people out there who are buying this latest
    status symbol are aware that their new toy will be a throw away item in 5-10
    years? Hmmm...I doubt the sales droids are saying anything except how these
    things are designed for after market, high priced 'insurance' deals.
     
  2. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    The life span of the Plasma display is about 20,000 to 30,000 hours
    depending on a number of factors. If the set is used for an average of 8
    hours a day, it will last about 7 to 8 years on the average. There will be
    many days where it may not be used at all, and other days where it may be
    used more than 8 hours. The lifespan of any TV made today is about the
    same.

    In the LCD display TV sets, the backlight life is about 20,000 hours
    average. Some manufactures are saying that it will last about 30,000 or
    40,000 hours, but this is with the brightness control at 50% setting. It
    may not be fun to watch when turned down this low.

    The MTBF rating of the screen is with the brightness at maximum. After the
    rated hours, the brightness of the screen should be 50% of the amount from
    when the screen was new.

    The technology to produce Plasma screens is fairly expensive. These screens
    do have a lower reliability factor of not only the screen but the circuitry
    behind it, because of inherent engineering problems. The LCD screens also
    have their problems as well, but are lower in cost to service. It is
    recommended to have a very good service contract on any of these types of TV
    sets. If there is a breakdown after warranty, they are very expensive to
    service.

    One of the big problems with Plasma displays, if used with computers, or
    fixed graphics, is that they will burn in very easily. LCD screens do not
    burn in, but are not as sharp as CRT or Plasma displays. A plasma screen
    will normally have burn in, in about 4 hours or so with a fixed image on the
    screen for a period of about 3 to 4 hours. This is at 50% brightness. If
    there are any fixed graphics on the screen, they will eventually burn in.
    The burn-in problem is inherent to the design characteristics of the screen.

    In about a year or so, most of the main manufactures will no longer be
    producing CRT type TV sets, and computer monitors. There will only be a few
    types of high end CRT monitors available for high end graphics and CAD work.
    All the technology will be mainly LCD and DLP type technology. The pricing
    of the TV sets using this type of technology will drop to affordable levels.

    In all practicality for home use, I would not recommend to purchase a Plasma
    or LCD screen for home use at this time. I would go with a good high end CRT
    type screen at a fraction of the price. For about $3500 US it is possible
    to have a very good high end HDTV CRT set, that would be much cheaper to
    service, and will last about 30,000 to 40,000 hours average. You can get
    about 8 to10 years of good use out of a good CRT set. For the price of an
    average Plasma or LCD screen, you can buy about 5 good TV sets that are much
    more reliable and cheaper to maintain!

    If you look at the value in relation to the cost, at this time the CRT
    screen is the best option. I must admit though, the pictures on the Plasma
    screen are very impressive. But, after about 5 years, they will not be so.
    I work for some companies that use Plasma displays for special displays and
    production use. They all have been serviced numerous times. Only the
    manufactures or manufacture service reps are able to service them. The out
    of warranty repairs were very expensive. The average repair bill was about
    $1500 for small problems that we were not able to do in-house. We have one
    with a burn-in of a graphic that was accidentally left up on it. The
    replacement estimate of the tube is about $5800 including the labour on this
    model. We may use this screen for applications that are not critical to the
    burn-in. The screen is 2 years old, and it may not pay to service.

    If you are buying any screen that is a demo model, it is important to put up
    the proper tests on it, to see if there are any burn-ins, and or any damaged
    pixels beyond the accepted amount. When buying any of these types of
    technology screens, it is important to know the "bad pixel" policy for the
    warranty. This is very important for computer monitors as well. Many
    manufactures consider 3 to 5 bad pixels per quadrant to be acceptable. Some
    manufactures specify up to 8 bad pixels per quadrant. Some people like
    myself, find a burned pixel to be very annoying, especially if it is a lit
    one.


    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    =========================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    =========================================


    My cousin, who has more money than brains, was recently going to purchase a
    60 inch plasma TV for $18K. I told him the bad in 5 years the picture
    tube will be only half as bright, and that plasma tv' s only have a useful
    life of 10 years before the tube needs to be replaced. He bought a LCD TV
    instead. I wonder just how many people out there who are buying this latest
    status symbol are aware that their new toy will be a throw away item in 5-10
    years? Hmmm...I doubt the sales droids are saying anything except how these
    things are designed for after market, high priced 'insurance' deals.
     
  3. Greysky

    Greysky Guest

    The technology behind the CRT is more reliable, and cheaper at this point.
    My last Trinitron tube died at 18 years, and only because of a power surge.
    I have seen the eye-candy-like display of new plasma tv's fade literally
    within weeks, during home burn in tests. What consumer paying that kind of
    money is going to want to pay another hefty fee to have a tech 'fine tune'
    the plasma tube after a month of heavy usage to 'get back the glitter'? Also
    forget about these units at high altitudes- friends living in Incline
    Village, Nevada had to return the monster they had bought because of the
    loud humming noise they normally make at low atmospheric pressures. As
    others have noted, with a simple repair costing $1500, these sets also make
    for more profits for the salesman selling them in the form of extended
    warrantys, which will not replace a plasma display tube that wants to crap
    out early, say 7 years after you bought it. Of course, having a flat TV you
    can hang on your wall may be the current 'in thing' for Yuppies to waste
    their income on (fools and their dollars are soon parted), but to my mind,
    it is a crime to peddle these things right now as true replacements for the
    picture tube because the technology behind them is still too new and is
    still being developed for reliability. It is smarter right now to pay
    one-third the price for a flat screen CRT and then replace it with a LCD TV
    which will most likely be be replacing everything in the next decade. If
    even one person reading this heeds my advice and delays purchasing one of
    these things for a few more years, they will thank me later.
     
  4. The real problem with making a larger CRT than that is that glass, like
    every material, has a bit of flexibility. In order to make the convergence
    and the alignment of the shadow mask of the tube stay correct, you have to
    thicken the glass front a lot as the size increases. Think of the
    square-cube law and you see why it is not very practical. Soon, the CRT
    would weigh a couple of hundred kilos.
     
  5. [snip]
    Does any of this make sense? First off, why would someone thank you
    later when they didn't buy something, hence they couldn't have known
    that they did have a lemon?

    But the worst one is extended warrantys [sic] don't make a profit if
    the equipment needs frequent repair!

    Double DUH!


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