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PIR Motion Sensors and Halloween animatronics

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by Woody213, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. Woody213

    Woody213

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    0
    Jul 17, 2019
    When it comes to Halloween I am a big kid. I have over 40 different animatronic Halloween decorations in my yard. Most run on 3.6v to 6v. Sadly enough most are sound activated. I am looking to purchase some PIR Motion Sensors from Amazon that run at 2.7v to 9v. They have a 3 way connector, VCC, V-OUT, and GND. Most of the devises have 2 wire try me plugs. My hope is to figure out the flow of current, + current out to VCC, V-OUT to the 2nd wire, and saudering from the battery (-) to the GND.

    Will this work?
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    696
    Oct 5, 2014
    Probably quite a few different types and configurations so how about a link to what you are referring to.
     
  3. Woody213

    Woody213

    2
    0
    Jul 17, 2019
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,439
    696
    Oct 5, 2014
    Unit specs on Amazon you linked to are rather vague however it does state the supply as being between 2.7V and 12V not 9V as you quoted in your original post.

    This next part I cannot work out what you are trying to say....

    All considered though it appears the output is a digital signal, high when detecting movement, and low after a period of no detection.
    This level of high and low would be dependent on the level of supply and any control element, be it transistor or whatever would need to be biased to operate at this level.
    As an example, if operating on a 2.7V supply, given internal components characteristics, it would be expected that the high signal would be a certain amount below this level.
    As it appears no specs on this are available, all one could hope for would be to experiment or chase up some youtube video from one who has.

    This might get you started.......
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2019
  5. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    2,372
    626
    May 12, 2015
    You will probably find that the 'try me' button or plug is just a 'jumper' with a N/O push button switch.
    So basically just bypassing the normal ON/OFF switch.
    upload_2019-7-18_9-35-24.jpeg

    Martin
     
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