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Pinout needed for TO-5 devices

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by DaveC, Nov 21, 2003.

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  1. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    I'm looking for pinout data for 2N333, 2N336, and 2N324. All are stated as
    being TO-5, a variant, AFAIK, of TO-92. All three of these are discontinued
    numbers.

    When I check NTEINC.com for a cross, I get NTE123A in a different package:

    http://www.nteinc.com/graphics/diag21a.gif

    National Semi and some others came up blank re. package data.

    Where can I find the original pinout for these 2N devices?

    (Which raises a general question: are all pinouts for all TO-5 devices the
    same?)

    Thanks,
     
  2. 2N324 PNP Germanium audio driver

    pin1 (the tab) Emitter
    Pin 2 Base (Connected to the case!) [Case 31(1)]
    Pin 3 collector
     
  3. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    Thomas,
    Thanks for your reply.

    I was not clear in my request. The 324, 333, and 326 are all plastic,
    "D-shaped" form factor. Is this TO-92? Is TO-5 only round metal? The only
    pinouts I could find match your data, but not the devices on my PCB.

    I need pinouts for these 3 device numbers in the black plastic "D-shaped"
    form factor.

    Thanks again for your effort,
     
  4. Are you kidding?
    Of course not!
    That would make too much sense. :)

    Jonesy
     
  5. I concur with the typical pinout for the TO-5 transistor except for the
    comment about the base being connected to the case......usual situation
    would be that the collector was connected to case.....wonder if that was
    just a typo (I'm fairly expert at those!).

    Gord
     
  6. "DaveC" wrote ...
    YES it is most likely TO-92

    Is TO-5 only round metal?

    YES

    Perhaps you are having trouble because you are using
    the wrong names for the case types.
     
  7. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    Yes, most likely :)

    Thanks!
     
  8. Dave, those part numbers were obsolete by 1970, so I don't have any
    data on the case, but I do have their basic data in the 1970 Motorola
    Semiconductor Data Book.
    --
    I say, the boy is so stupid that he tried to make a back up copy of his
    hard drive on the Xerox machine!

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  9. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    The 2N324, 2N326, and 2N333 are JEDEC registered devices, so their
    housings should always be TO-5.

    If you have plastic housed versions of the devices, then they are most
    likely TO-92. The problem with that is that there are (according to
    National's 1993 Discrete products databook) three pinout footprints for
    the TO-92 package, the TO-92(92), the TO-92(94), and the TO-92(96).

    Looking at the flat of the housing with the legs pointing down, the
    TO-92(92) pins out EBC from left to right, the TO-92(94) pins out ECB,
    and the TO-92(96) pins out BEC. So, to sort out what's what you'll
    probably need to get into the thing's guts and do a little reverse
    engineering.

    The 1964 GE Transistor Manual has spec's for all three in case you need
    to get equivalents, and "3" in their "Dwg.No." column corresponds to
    TO-5. Unfortunately, they didn't list the package for the 2N326 but
    it's rated for 7 watts so, clearly, it won't be in a TO-5 can. Much
    less in a TO-92 package! I've scanned the page and I'll post it to
    alt.binaries.schematics.electronic sometime today.


    The spec's for the 2N326 are at:
    http://www.dscc.dla.mil/Downloads/MilSpec/Docs/MIL-PRF-19500/mil19500ss40.pdf
    http://www.dscc.dla.mil/Downloads/MilSpec/Docs/MIL-PRF-19500/mil19500ss40am1.pdf

    which makes me think that if you're looking at something in a TO-92
    package that has 2N326 written on it, then there's something drastically
    wrong!

    The definitive spec's for the 2N333 are at:
    http://www.dscc.dla.mil/Downloads/MilSpec/Docs/MIL-PRF-19500/mil19500ss37.pdf


    P.S., I haven't forgotten about your schematic, I just haven't gotten a
    round tuit... BTW, is that 24VAC relay what you have in mind for
    shunting the resistors?
     
  10. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  11. DaveC

    DaveC Guest

    I misprinted: it's not "326", but rather "336".

    These all have the National logo (NS) followed by either "333", "324", or
    "336". I presume that they are all 2N devices.
    That's the wonderful thing about specifications; there's so many to choose
    from :)
    Presumed so, albeit as a last resort...
    Yes. I had a new one just sitting around that I'd like to use.

    Thanks,
     
  12. "DaveC" wrote ...
    Not a safe presumption. They could be "house numbers"
    or even a date code. (Date codes are sometimes encoded.)

    Where did they come from? Those numbers sound too low
    (old) to be in modern TO-92, IMHO.
     
  13. Well, the TO-39, which looks identical to the TO-5, will easily handle
    7 watts, with a heatsink of course. The TO-39 case has the chip
    bonded to the header, so the collector lead is usually welded directly
    to the case.

    AAMOF RCA made the 2N4036, 40412, 40346, 40347, & 40412 among many
    others, all of which were in a TO-5 case and rated for a dissipation
    of 7W or greater, in some cases 10W. This _was_ a true TO-5 case.

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    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
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  14. First off, the 2N300s were germanium, with the exception of the Texas
    Instruments 2N333 thru 338 series. Germanium transistors could not be
    passivated like a silicon can, so they were almost always mounted in a
    hermetically sealed metal container. If they were germanium and
    mounted in a plastic container, they would not last long, after a
    short time the plastic would contaminate the junctions.

    So that means it's unlikely that these transistors were germanium.

    --
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    ###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
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    goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
    Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
    that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
    http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
    Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
    changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
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  15. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Hogwash. I suggest you get a data sheet for a 2N4036 and take a look at
    power dissipation VS case and ambient temp.

    Here's one from Motorola

    http://212.57.231.17/datasheets/67/OWOSNOVWOP.pdf

    and even though they've got the Ta and Tc curves labeled backwards it
    might give you a clue. Besides, I don't think the OP mentioned anything
    about a heat sink, so even if it _was_ TO-5 instead of TO-92 it would be
    operating in an enclosure at a Ta of >25° C, which means he wouldn't
    even be able to get a watt out of it.
     
  16. Checking National's site to see if they may be ICs:

    LM333 - negative voltage regulator, TO-3 (no TO92 package listed)

    LM336 - 2.5 volt voltage reference available in a TO 92 package.

    LM324 - quad opamp - needs more than 3 pins, so not your part.
     
  17. No, it's _not_ hogwash! RCA Manual SC-15 Page 420. Right there in
    black and white: 7W. To prove it, I'll post a pic of the page to
    ABSE. Look for 2N4036 data sheet.


    --
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    ###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
    http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
    My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
    goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
    Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
    that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
    http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
    Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
    changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
    @@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
     
  18. Al

    Al Guest

    The Motorola spec. says max Vceo is -65V and max. current is 100mA. That
    works out to 6.5W. Specs, though, may vary from manufacturer to
    manufacturer.

    Max power diss. is usually spec'ed with a case ambient of 25C. Kinda
    hard to maintain this with any kind of long term lifetime. Many times
    curves for various specs are extrapolated from lower power settings,
    currents and the like for marketing purposes. Beware if you try to use a
    component at its max ratings.

    Al
     
  19. Tim Shoppa

    Tim Shoppa Guest

    The datasheets from the 60's and 70's often have such nonsense in the
    bold type at top. If you read down further you see that this spec only
    applies if you keep the case at 25C... which given typical TO-5 heatsinks
    means an ambient temp below -60C if the average dissipation is 7 watts
    for even a fraction of a second. And that the measurements above
    the half-watt level were made using pulse techniques.

    Tim.
     
  20. I have only one thing to say. Read the 2N4036 data that I posted to
    ABSe.

    --
    @@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@,@@[email protected]@[email protected],@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@
    ###Got a Question about ELECTRONICS? Check HERE First:###
    http://users.pandora.be/educypedia/electronics/databank.htm
    My email address is whitelisted. *All* email sent to it
    goes directly to the trash unless you add NOSPAM in the
    Subject: line with other stuff. alondra101 <at> hotmail.com
    Don't be ripped off by the big book dealers. Go to the URL
    that will give you a choice and save you money(up to half).
    http://www.everybookstore.com You'll be glad you did!
    Just when you thought you had all this figured out, the gov't
    changed it: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html
    @@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@[email protected]@@
     
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