Connect with us

Piezo buzzer at 20 hz

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by pinoynva, Jun 5, 2012.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. pinoynva

    pinoynva

    2
    0
    Jun 5, 2012
    I am trying to vibrate cells in a plate at 20 hz. Is that possible with a piezo buzzer and a waveform generator that can generate 20 hz?

    If it is, how do you do it?
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,389
    2,270
    Nov 17, 2011
    20 Hz is not a typical operating frequenvy for a piezo but it should work. Just connect the two leads of the piezo to a 20 Hz AC source. The waveform should be ideally sinusoidal. Other waveforms work as well, but you'll have to live with the overtones which a piezo can easily render.

    Harald
     
  3. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    The resonant frequency of a Piezo is many octaves higher than this, near 2KHz.
     
  4. pinoynva

    pinoynva

    2
    0
    Jun 5, 2012
    Are you telling me that I can't use buzzers? I read that piezo buzzers has a set frequency but transducers don't. On the other hand, piezoelectric devices respond to the frequency generated. Do you have a suggestion on what I should use? I just need something small that can vibrate at that frequency.
     
  5. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,389
    2,270
    Nov 17, 2011
    No,
    read my post. it is possible, although not the optimal operating point.

    Harald
     
  6. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    I would suspect that if your purpose is to produce audio it's going to be quite feeble.
     
  7. john monks

    john monks

    693
    1
    Mar 9, 2012
    Harald Kapp is correct. Piezo transducers typically don't go that low. Why not use a base speaker? That would certainly give you a lot of amplitude.
     
  8. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,270
    Nov 28, 2011
    I think piezo transducers typically have a pretty low capacitance. It will be hard to transfer a lot of power to them at a low frequency because their reactance will be so high. You might need a very high voltage signal in order to transfer any real power to a piezo transducer at 20 Hz sinusoidal.
     
  9. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,389
    2,270
    Nov 17, 2011
  10. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    Ha, I forgot about that thread and it was just a few weeks ago! ;)
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-