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Pickup Winder Build

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Charliethecat, Jan 16, 2013.

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  1. Charliethecat

    Charliethecat

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Hi, please accept my apologies in advance but I have pretty much zero electronics knowledge. I've been trying to build a guitar pickup winder which seemed straight forward in my head but unfortunately nothing has gone to plan and I am stuck at the first hurdle.

    I'm not really that interested in the electronics side of things if I'm honest, I just want to experiment building guitar pickups but need a winder to do so.

    I have a 5v power supply, a miniature 1.5v - 12v electric motor and a 12v - 24v PWM speed controller. It was my thinking that I could just connect all three and they would work. This has not been the case. I have tested the motor and it works fine without the speed controller, just not when everything is all connected. The controller has a little LED which lights up but apart from that appears to do nothing.

    As mentioned earlier I am a complete beginner and know I am probably missing something blindingly obvious to anyone who knows anything about electronics. Unfortunately I don't. I don't have a multi-meter so can't do any proper testing etc and just have a feeling that it isn't the speed controller. I've tried swapping the +/- etc just to check it's not something as simple as that and I'm pretty sure it isn't.

    If anyone has any help/advice it would be much appreciated. This is holding me back and is frustrating to say the least. I just want to build some guitar pickups and can't afford to buy a winder.

    I'm tempted to take an old electric fan to bits and just use a dimmer switch but I've already spent money on parts and don't want to see them go to waste.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. oyvdahl

    oyvdahl

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    Oct 11, 2012
    What kind of input voltage does the PWM speed controller need?
     
  3. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,270
    Nov 28, 2011
    Your speed controller is designed to be powered from 12~24V but you're using a 5v power supply with it?

    Can you post part numbers and links to data sheets or catalogue pages for your power supply, your speed controller, and your motor?

    What is the actual problem? The motor doesn't turn when you use the speed controller? (You didn't actually say what the problem is.)
     
  4. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    What is the purpose of the speed control? Could you just put a resistor from the power supply to the motor to give a reasonable speed.

    I am at present building a speed controlled drive (car radiator fan motor) to power an AVO coil winder.

    You may not wind as fast as you would do with an adjustable supply but patience is a virtue!
     
  5. Charliethecat

    Charliethecat

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Thanks for the input so far. The speed controller is so I can have the flexibility to wind at a speed I feel comfortable at my own pace. I thought the 5v power supply would do the trick just with less output but unfortunately this wasn't the case. I have now got the winder sort of working. The hard part now is getting the counter sorted. I bought the below item from Ebay:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/0-56-Red-...t=BI_Control_Systems_PLCs&hash=item5aed59dd3f

    Unfortunately I can't get it to work which I supposed shouldn't come as a surprise. The little diagrams are completely meaningless to me and Google is little help. If anyone could explain what the terms "com", "PNP" and "NPN" mean in this contact it would be much appreciated. Electronics seems so hard. Wouldn't be so bad if I actually wanted to learn electronics but I just want to build pickups.

    I've tried wiring it up and all I get is a quick flash of zeros and then nothing. If anyone could just tell me what I need to do to wire it up it would be a massive help and much appreciated. I'm trying to use it with a reed switch if that makes any difference.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  6. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
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    Nov 28, 2011
    OK. First, you need to remove any jumpers from the 3x2 jumper block, to set it to plain ol' counter mode with no decimal point, as shown in the top left picture under "Function Selection".

    Then you need to provide a supply voltage, which is variously specified as "12-24V" and "5V or 9-12V", between pins 5 and 4 of the 5-pin connector, with positive to pin 5 and negative (0V) to pin 4. That should make the counter come up showing 00000 and remaining ON.

    Finally you need to connect your reed switch between pin 5 of the 5-pin connector (which is supply positive) and either pin 1 or pin 2, as shown below "Dry Contact". The diagram shows the contact connecting to pin 1, but pin 1 is described as Reset; pin 2 looks like it should be the Count input. Try both and see which one works.

    Good luck!

    P.S. Reed switches will generate a small amount of contact bounce (Wikipedia it). Depending on the characteristics of the counter, this could cause the counter to increment more than once on each contact closure. Run a test to find out for sure. If there is a problem with contact bounce you will need to add some external signal conditioning. This could be as simple as a capacitor, or maybe a Schmitt trigger IC with some small components.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  7. Charliethecat

    Charliethecat

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    Jan 16, 2013
    Thankyou for all your help, especially you KrisBlueNZ. I've been tinkering around again tonight and unfortunately reckon I have fried the counter. I ended up connecting it to a 12v power supply which worked but the reading came up as 0000.0. I managed to get the reset/count functions working but couldn't for the life of me get the standard 5 digit count function to work. Ended up trying to mess with the connections labelled 1,2,3,4,5 and 6 but think I have shorted something. Bit ****ed off not because it was a waste of money, more because I waited three weeks for it to arrive from China. Unfortunately the project is now on hold until I can get hold of some new counters. I plan on ordering two more because chances are I will cock up again.

    Once again thank you all for the help so far.
     
  8. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,270
    Nov 28, 2011
    Connect your 12V supply across pins 5 and 4, and connect a wire to pin 2. Touch the other end of the wire on pin 4 and the count should increment.

    If there's a decimal point showing, you must have a jumper present on the jumper block. Make sure there are no jumpers on it.

    This is all assuming the counter is not damaged. It should be quite hard to damage it, assuming it has the normal protection against reverse polarity supply.
     
  9. Charliethecat

    Charliethecat

    4
    0
    Jan 16, 2013
    Cheers Kris, you are spot on. I managed to get all that functionality working, unfortunately didn't realise that jumpers could be removed. I instead thought I had to solder between the relevant point no the circuit board. Although I didn't actually attempt this I did get a wire and experiment connecting the contacts. I realise now this is probably somewhat retarded and have a feeling I have somehow shorted/overloaded something which has wrecked the counter. I have a new one ordered though.
     
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