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Picking and understanding microcontroller for a project

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by superderp, Feb 7, 2015.

  1. superderp

    superderp

    2
    0
    Feb 7, 2015
    Hello there, I'm entirely new here, and thought I'd start with saying Hi!, so Hi!

    As said in the title, I need some help with choosing a suitable microcontroller for a project.

    The idea is like this. I have a bunch of oled and tft-screens, all driven with either SPI or i2c.These displays will be showing some drawn graphics, the graphics are "hard-coded" from bitmaps, so on a 128x64 monochrome oled there are 16 * 8 hex-values. or as I understand 128 bytes, per image (right?) Of course for a 320x260 color tft this is much larger.. Every display will have its own "library" of these hex images, and need to be able to show these in everything from 1 fps to 12 fps. Think like short gif-loops.

    So, I guess main concern is storage space, the more hex-images I can show, the better. And then there's speed, These need to run fairly quickly. Last but not least, as little hardware hassle as possible, I don't know electronics, but I know programming (mainly c++), I was hoping on something quite easy to set up and then run trial and error on coding.

    I hope I've been clear in my questions, and I'm thankful for any suggestions.
     
  2. BobK

    BobK

    7,645
    1,662
    Jan 5, 2010
    128x64 is 1024 bytes, but that would represent only single bit per pixel. I expect that it is actually either 4 or 8 bits of grayscale per pixel. That makes it either 8192 bytes or 16384 bytes per image.

    Typical microcontrollers do no have much memory. 128K of flash and maybe 32K of RAM for the larger one. I think something like a Raspberry PI would be more appropriate for what you want to do.

    Bob
     
  3. superderp

    superderp

    2
    0
    Feb 7, 2015
    Thanks for the answer,
    well, the monochromes are actually one bit per pixel, on or off. so yeah, that would be 1024 bytes then.. But alright, they might be unsuitable for this then. I have an UDOO Quad which I haven't even gotten around to use yet, a bit hesitant about getting into setting it up, but I guess it wouldn't be harder than to do it the micro-controller way.

    Thanks again!
     
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