Connect with us

PIC development board

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by vick5821, Feb 1, 2012.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. vick5821

    vick5821

    700
    0
    Jan 22, 2012
    Hey guys, just something to be shared.
    Recently I have built a PIC development board, and I use PIC16f877A as the chip :)
    Below is the picture.
    The extra space there is for development purpose :)
    Do give some comments.

    Thank you :)

    [​IMG]
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    Why not a solderless breadboard?

    Show us the other side, we may have more comments about that.

    If you get a small solderless breadboard and attach it to the board you have here, you can use jumpers from the sockets you've placed beside the PIC to conect them to an easier prototyping section.
     
  3. vick5821

    vick5821

    700
    0
    Jan 22, 2012
    I did contrusted them in breadboard..then I transfer them so as to become a development board that is rigid.Oh ya..Good idea.Get a small breadboard and attached them to the space on the board..Thanks

    Backside of the board.I know it's messy :(
    [​IMG]
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    No problems. I was just thinking that it might have been veroboard with long conductors left connected.

    What I'd advise you to do is to get a piece of plastic the same size as your board and place it under the matrix board. Then use standoffs or something similar to make legs for it.

    If you do that then you can put it down on your work surface without fear that a component or wire you've left lying around is going to short something out.
     
  5. Rleo6965

    Rleo6965

    585
    9
    Jan 22, 2012
    What programming language your going to use?
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012
  6. vick5821

    vick5821

    700
    0
    Jan 22, 2012
    C language :)

    Any other easier language ?
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    Plenty.

    But none that are as universal.
     
  8. D_Hambley

    D_Hambley

    11
    0
    Sep 1, 2011
    My first thought was, "what can someone do with that?". How are you planning to program it? Your question, "any other easier language?" makes me wonder what your experience is.
    If the PIC16F887 is what you want to use then you can self-teach yourself very quickly with a kit. The PICKit2 Debug Express from Microchip comes complete with a PIC16F887. The kit comes with some easy lessons. You can buy it directly from Microchip for about $50. I would recommend that.
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    Your first thought makes me wonder what experience YOU'VE had.
     
  10. vick5821

    vick5821

    700
    0
    Jan 22, 2012
    [​IMG]
    Final Product after add some stand and case for it for easy development :)
    Any suggestion or comment please feel free to share :)
    p/s To be honest, thanks to steve for giving me the idea of using breadboard for easy development :)
     
  11. Rleo6965

    Rleo6965

    585
    9
    Jan 22, 2012
    Don't forget to place current limit resistor to each LED. Unless Controller have built in current limit.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2012
  12. vick5821

    vick5821

    700
    0
    Jan 22, 2012
    how do I know if they have it ?
     
  13. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    The PIC microcontrollers do not have current limiiting, you must use resistors.

    Bob
     
  14. D_Hambley

    D_Hambley

    11
    0
    Sep 1, 2011
    Vick, I built a board which looks like yours over 20 years ago for a 80C86. The lack of a ground plane caused such high impedance that the signal edges were ringing, causing multiple interrupts and all other sorts of problems. I solved it by making a crude ground plane from copper tape backed with plastic on the bottom of the board. I soldered each return pin of each IC to this plane. No, it wasn't perfect but the ringing went away and the board worked. This would be easy to do with you board. Good luck.
     
  15. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    Not necessary. I have run PICs on solderless breadboards, various prototype boards as well as PC boards all without a ground plane and they run just fine.

    Bob
     
  16. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    I can't even remember seeing a commercial product using a microcontroller that has a ground plane.

    PIC outputs are essentially current limited, and while this makes it safe to simply connect a LED to them, I would always use a resistor.

    You don't want to get into bad habits.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-