Connect with us

Philips EcoBoost Halogen Lamps

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by Paul M. Eldridge, Jul 20, 2006.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. I've read the following press announcement several times, but I'm
    still confused as to how this technology works. For example, we're
    told the lamp burner runs "cooler" and thereby produces more light
    and, in my naivety, I thought incandescent and halogen lamp efficiency
    worked opposite to this.

    See:
    http://www.lighting.philips.com/gl_...main=global&parent=4390&id=gl_en_news&lang=en

    I guess I have two questions. One, does this lamp, in effect, combine
    two technologies -- an IR capsule coating and an integrated
    low-voltage transformer -- and, secondly, did this press release lose
    something in its translation?

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  2. The press release is definitely confusing. From the lower
    photo is it obvious that this lamp uses a line voltage to
    low voltage converter. From the efficacy claims I would
    suspect the lamp uses IR reflector technology, but it is not
    clear. It is also not clear if the "burner" is the filament
    tube or the filament itself. If the filament tube then the
    "special compound" is probably an IR reflecting coating,
    which reflects heat back onto the filament. It does not
    conduct heat away as stated. If the burner is the filament,
    then Philips has succeeded in developing a selective
    emitting coating for the filament that suppresses some of
    the IR radiation. Various organizations have been working
    toward this goal for 10 to 20 years, but no one has yet been
    successful.

    Remember also that the efficacy gains are given in
    comparison with 220 to 240-volt incandescent lamps, which
    are significantly less efficient than 120-volt incandescent
    lamps. For example, a 100-watt, 120-volt, 750-hour
    incandescent lamps has an efficacy of about 16.9 lm/W while
    I believe the 240-volt version of this lamp has an efficacy
    between 13 and 14 lm/W.

    --
    Vic Roberts
    http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com
    To reply via e-mail:
    replace xxx with vdr in the Reply to: address
    or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.

    This information is provided for educational purposes only.
    It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web
    site without written permission.
     
  3. To the latter, definitely. It's far from clear.

    I saw the CHL-i lamp recently in Frankfurt. It is, AFAICS, a low-voltage
    halogen capsule with a transformer crammed into a GLS bulb (or a candle,
    or whatever). Neat, though I didn't think at the time to ask whether it
    was dimmable. It seems entirely possible that the capsule has an
    infra-red coating, but I don't know whether it actually does.
     
  4. I suspect your hunch is correct. It makes good sense, at least from
    an efficiency point of view, to combine the two technologies.
    Frankly, I'm a little surprised (and disappointed) GE's Diamond
    Precise lamp doesn't, given the incremental cost of incorporating an
    IR coating is likely to be relatively small and the boost in light
    output would be rather significant, perhaps in the order of 50 per
    cent (i.e., from 260 to 400 lumens).
    Indeed. When I would visit my parents in the U.K., I was always
    struck by the noticeably reduced light output and lower colour
    temperature; every incandescent lamp looked like it was dimmed about
    25 per cent.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  5. GE's Diamond Precise lamp is, in fact, dimmable (I have roughly thirty
    of these lamps in my home) . That said, I had to remove the dimmers
    on these circuits because the LOUD buzzing from these lamps was so
    damn annoying (if you closed your eyes, you would swear you were
    locked inside a transformer vault).

    I honestly don't know if I recieved a bad batch or if this is a design
    limitation -- my (repeated) inquiries with GE's customer support group
    went unanswered. :(

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  6. Hi Joe,

    I run Netscape 7.2, so I too share your pain. And, yes, I wish more
    web designers would wake up to the fact that it's a big world out
    there and not all of us use IE.

    Like you, I have considerable respect for Philips. I applaud their
    social responsibility and, in particular, their efforts to minimize
    the environmental impact of their products. It's a shame this
    particular press release only clouds our understanding of what could
    very well be a major step forward in halogen lighting.

    BTW, this recent Philips announcement certainly caused me serious neck
    snap! Their 25 and 32-watt Extra Long Life T8 fluorescent lamps have
    a rated life of 40,000 hours on standard instant start ballasts and
    46,000 hours on programmed start (12 hours per start). And, of
    course, longer service life means re-lamping intervals can be extended
    an additional two, three or more years, resulting in less disruption
    to operations, lower maintenance costs and reduced material waste.

    See:
    http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/can/ecatalog/fluor/pdf/p-5794.pdf
    and
    http://www.nam.lighting.philips.com/can/ecatalog/catalogs/p-5795.pdf

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  7. In Firefox you just resize the window, I don't know about Netscape.
     
  8. Hi John,

    Unfortunately, that doesn't seem possible with Netscape. Moreover, if
    you try to reposition this miniaturized window, it immediately snaps
    back to the centre of the screen.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  9. Travis Evans

    Travis Evans Guest

    What about disabling Javascript's ability to move and resize existing
    windows? In Firefox 1.5 it's in Preferences under Content > Advanced
    button next to Enable Javascript. In Netscape and other versions of
    Firefox it's probably somewhere else.
     
  10. Hi Travis,

    Thank you for helping me resolve TWO vexing problems. I've made one
    minor adjustment to your recommendation. If I turn off Javascript
    completely, the Philips site (and no doubt others like it) becomes a
    complete mess (literally). However, Netscape permits me to turn off
    selected script commands, including one that controls the movement AND
    resizing of windows (whoohoo, pay dirt!)

    The steps to do this are as follows:
    Edit > Preferences > Advanced > Scripts & Plug-ins. Within the "Allow
    Scripts to" window, remove the checkmark beside the "Move or resize
    existing windows" entry (the first item within this list), then click
    "OK". Problem solved.

    Thanks again for helping me correct these annoyances; your assistance
    is very much appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  11. For those who may have missed the announcement, it appears these lamps
    will be sold under the "Edore" name and will be available for purchase
    later this year.

    "One of Philips’s revolutionary products in this respect is an energy
    saving halogen bulb for the home -- called Edore. It offers clear
    crisp lighting and uses 50% less energy than the ordinary household
    bulb. Available in the second half of 2007, the Edore is a retrofit
    halogen bulb that can be used in a normal fitting."

    Source:
    http://www.newscenter.philips.com/About/News/press/article-15721.html

    In terms of luminous efficacy, is it reasonable to assume these
    products will be more or less comparable to GE's forthcoming (first
    generation) high efficiency lamp (i.e., ~ 30 lpw)? And is GE still
    targeting commercial release sometime in 2010? [Hate to sound
    impatient, but I'm kinda hoping we might see them sooner.]

    Source:
    http://home.businesswire.com/portal...120&newsLang=en&ndmConfigId=1001109&vnsId=681

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  12. TKM

    TKM Guest

    From the limited technical information in the announcements I'm guessing
    that the initial "high-efficacy" incandescent lamps use halogen technology
    with heat reflecting films. Philips, OSI and GE have had commercial
    products for some time; so it makes sense to move that experience into
    consumer products. What technology is involved in GE's second generation
    products, I don't know -- perhaps ceramic filaments which have been
    discussed in the research literature. Any other guesses?

    Terry McGowan
     
  13. The evidence is point to new filament materials, ceramic or
    otherwise.

    --
    Vic Roberts
    http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com
    To reply via e-mail:
    replace xxx with vdr in the Reply to: address
    or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.

    This information is provided for educational purposes only.
    It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web
    site without written permission.
     
  14. Thanks, Terry and Victor, for confirming this. In addition to the IR
    coatings, the Philips product includes an integral transformer, which
    obviously kicks things up a notch or two. I'm guessing the first
    generation GE offerings will too.

    Ceramic filaments -- either alone or in combination with IR coatings
    -- would be a huge step forward. Any sense of what we could expect in
    terms of filament life?

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  15. As with any other filament material, life will be a
    trade-off against temperature and therefore efficacy. Based
    on the way things have been done in the past, as we can see
    from halogen IR lamps, life has been made longer than
    conventional lamps, at some sacrifice in efficacy, since
    people seem more willing to pay for longer life than higher
    efficacy. With the new push for energy reduction, it will
    be interesting to see if the marketing rules change.

    --
    Vic Roberts
    http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com
    To reply via e-mail:
    replace xxx with vdr in the Reply to: address
    or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.

    This information is provided for educational purposes only.
    It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web
    site without written permission.
     
  16. The GE press releases on this subject talk about new materials, so I am
    leaning more to the belief that they're maybe focussing on filaments that
    make better emitters of visible light. Or maybe someone has finally figured
    out how to make a practical anti-stokes phosphor that converts infra-red
    into visible light ;-)

    If GE was simply going to copy the principle of the Philips EcoBoost, they'd
    have a lamp on the market by next year. It's all known technology, so it
    makes me think they must be looking at something much more advanced.

    Incidentally the first Philips EcoBoost lamps went on sale earlier this
    month in France. It's rated 20W and aims to replace 40W incandescent with
    410 lumens output. That puts it at 20.5 lumens per watt. They claim
    "Average Life Up to 3000 hours". Price was about 15 Euros. That brings it
    in at about five times the retail price of Philips CFLs. Given that the CFL
    uses half as much energy again and lasts 8000 hours they obviously need to
    bring the price down considerably if it's going to compete!

    James.
     
  17. The GE press releases on this subject talk about new materials, so I am
    leaning more to the belief that they're maybe focussing on filaments that
    make better emitters of visible light. Or maybe someone has finally figured
    out how to make a practical anti-stokes phosphor that converts infra-red
    into visible light ;-) They talk of lasting roughly half as long as CFLs
    but being a lot cheaper, so I would guess something around 3000-4000 hours.

    If GE was simply going to copy the principle of the Philips EcoBoost, they'd
    have a lamp on the market by next year. It's all known technology, so it
    makes me think they must be looking at something much more advanced.

    Incidentally the first Philips EcoBoost lamps went on sale earlier this
    month in France. It's rated 20W and aims to replace 40W incandescent with
    410 lumens output. That puts it at 20.5 lumens per watt. They claim
    "Average Life Up to 3000 hours". Price was about 15 Euros. That brings it
    in at about five times the retail price of Philips CFLs. Given that the CFL
    uses half as much energy again and lasts 8000 hours they obviously need to
    bring the price down considerably if it's going to compete!

    James.
     
  18. Thanks, James, for confirming this. Although I was sort of hoping the
    numbers might come in a little higher, I guess 20.5 lumens per watt is
    about all you can expect at this lower wattage.

    As a point of reference, Philip's 20MRC16/IRC/FL36 is rated at 400
    lumens (20 lpw) and their 35 and 45 watt versions come in at 870 and
    1180 lumens respectively (24.8 & 26.2 lpw). Osram Sylvania's
    50BT4Q/IR clocks in at 1,320 lumens (26.4 lpw). These numbers do not
    include transformer losses, so the actual lpw ratings would be
    slightly lower.

    Given that the GE offerings are intended to be 60 and 100-watt GS
    replacements, I'm guessing 25 to 28 lumens per watt would be
    achievable using current technology (i.e., integral transformer and IR
    coatings) and assuming a 3,000 hour service life.

    Cheers,
    Paul
     
  19. Paul Eldridge mentions in an earlier article in this thread an "integral
    transformer" as best as I recall.

    My speculation is that this is a stepdown transformer, since luminous
    efficacy of an incandescent lamp design varies with design voltage even
    with constant design wattage and design life expectancy. For design
    wattage 20 watts and design life expectancy in the thousand hour ballpark,
    it appears to me that a design voltage around 10-12 volts results in close
    to maximizing luminous efficacy for such design wattage and life
    expectancy.

    Fairly ordinary 12 volt 20 watt halogen lamps with rated life expectancy
    at least a couple thousand hours are rated to achieve 17.5 lumens/watt. I
    suspect that a conservative attempt at combining a tungsten filament with
    HIR technology in a 10-12-volt-ballpark halogen lamp can easily exceed
    20.5 lumens/watt by a factor that will allow for transformer losses.

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  20. After Light Fair 2006 I received confirmation from either
    Osram or Philips that their lamp did contain an electronic
    power supply to run the filament at reduced voltage. The
    first generation of high performance incandescent lamps
    clearly use low voltage + halogen + IR. The open question
    is: what new technology will be added to the next
    generation?


    --
    Vic Roberts
    http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com
    To reply via e-mail:
    replace xxx with vdr in the Reply to: address
    or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.

    This information is provided for educational purposes only.
    It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web
    site without written permission.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-