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Philips DCC - stuck cassette drawer

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Eeyore, Nov 3, 2006.

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  1. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    I've got one of the Philips DCC ( digital compact cassette) machines - mains
    operated.

    Whilst there are some issues with the longevity of the digital recording ( self
    erasure ) it's a truly fabulous analogue playback deck which is my main use for
    it now.

    It's got a motorised cassette drawer that refused to open after a period of not
    being used so I opened it up and fiddled with it and got it open.

    Trying to find out what was causing the problem I very gently 'poked' a bit more
    and now I've jammed it even worse !

    Is *anyone* at all familiar with how this crazy drawer mechanism works ?

    Graham
     
  2. Scott Dorsey

    Scott Dorsey Guest

    I know how some of the Philips standard cassette machines work. Does it
    have a belt on the loading motor by any chance? One that is slipping?
    --scott
     
  3. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    It's actually hard to see. I'm trying to get the front panel off to see it
    better but I suspect I need the drawer to eject to get the panel off !!!!

    It does sound like a slipping belt but there's something quite solid jamming
    things. I can't make it move with my finger as I did initially to release the
    jam.

    I could take some pics and post them in a binaries group.

    Graham
     
  4. Perhaps the front of the drawer slides off? Or there is an eject hole (paper
    clip)?


    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    + Required crap appended to avoid restrictions imposed by brain +
    + damaged idiots.
    +
    + Server Response: '441 Posting Failed (Rejected by POST filter)', +
    + Port: 119, Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 441,
    +
    + Error Number: 0x800CCCA9
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  5. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    I wish ! The drawer is fully motorised both for insertion and retraction.

    Graham
     
  6. I have a Mitsubishi set-up like that DA-L70/LT-70 programmable 7 tape
    changer and record player. Very complex. But you can take the covers off and
    wind the mechanism by hand - VERY carefully.



    --
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    + Required crap appended to avoid restrictions imposed by brain +
    + damaged idiots.
    +
    + Server Response: '441 Posting Failed (Rejected by POST filter)', +
    + Port: 119, Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 441,
    +
    + Error Number: 0x800CCCA9
    +
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
     
  7. frankwm

    frankwm Guest

    This can be an issue with powered Akai doors.
    Only a few days back I took a mint 1987 GX-8 from its box - stored
    about 2 years.
    Inserted tape - then door wouldn't re-open.
    Took some time to realise the problem was after the door shuts and the
    tape heads are engaged for playback that the transport mechanism didn't
    then disengage - leaving the casstte 'locked' into place - with the
    powered door trying to open.
    The problem is caused by the grease points having solidified/thickened
    over time (same on 8000 series Beocords).
    If the Philips mechanism is similar check the raise/lower cycle without
    a tape in place. If it doesn't disengage smoothly and quickly then
    simply oil the relevant joints.
     
  8. JANA

    JANA Guest

    Remove the cover, and see what is jammed. The machine may need a new set of
    belts. Belts are a common problem. If the machine is an older unit, and has
    a lot of hours on it, it is possible that it needs a proper maintenance by
    someone who is experienced at this type of work.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    I've got one of the Philips DCC ( digital compact cassette) machines - mains
    operated.

    Whilst there are some issues with the longevity of the digital recording (
    self
    erasure ) it's a truly fabulous analogue playback deck which is my main use
    for
    it now.

    It's got a motorised cassette drawer that refused to open after a period of
    not
    being used so I opened it up and fiddled with it and got it open.

    Trying to find out what was causing the problem I very gently 'poked' a bit
    more
    and now I've jammed it even worse !

    Is *anyone* at all familiar with how this crazy drawer mechanism works ?

    Graham
     
  9. ...
    Most mechanisms of this kind rely on a small dc motor, the axle of which turn a drive
    belt to a pulley which is then scaled down for torque and slow speed. At this point
    the tray is connected, it is then that some clever electronics must detect by
    contacts that the tray is in closed position or in open position at which points
    motor power must be cut. It is usually possible to push the tray and the strain
    disconnects the contact that means tray open, thereby prompting the electronics to
    power the motor for moving the tray in, unt ilit is again stopped and a contact
    meaning closed is activated.
    Usually but unfortunately not always the tray has a front plastic part which is
    detachable. This part is wide enough to cover the tray and part of the opening on the
    front plate whre the tray comes out.
    In order to remove it you must determine which way it detaches, on most systems it is
    done by moving the plastic part up in relation to the tray, but most often you must
    pull the tray out a little to clear the front plate.
    Many systems emply some sort of a grip on the tray while in closed mode, which means
    you cannot easily pull the tray out using your fingernails. And doing so *might*
    damage the tray and or the closed tray detection contact.

    The trayscan be implemented in a lots of different ways with the detection contacts
    on the point where the tray must stop or on any cogwheel in the assembly.
    Sonys trays of the late 80s and early 90s designs for instance, are notorious for
    getting out of sync because the movement on the tray is calculated not by the trays
    position, but its relation to the cogs on the tray on the cogwheel which travels a
    certain milage. When the vogs are worn the tray easily slips, and chaning one habit
    of pushing the tray tyo make it close shows up years later as not only a bad habit
    but a destructive behaviour. There is a reason why they label the buttons Eject or
    Open/Close. Quite possibly the manufacturers one by one realise that people are prone
    to push the tray - and actually do so regardless on what the ejection button is
    labelled.

    I think it is best to attack the problem from the other side, in the absence of a
    service manual, or a hole for inserting a straightened paperclip.
    It is probably very difficult to remove the cassette while the tray is closed, but
    perhaps locating the motor and turning the axle by fingers will determine wether the
    mechanism is slipping due to a drive belt getting too old or wether the lubricants
    have gone solid, sticky or even turned to a thick paste or powder.
    using your fingers on the inside of the deck is should be possible to wind the motor
    axle by hand and also help the tray out. Once out remove the cassette and set about
    gently dissameble the deck and remove the libricants and clean the remains and relube
    using grease fro mthe local electronic component pusher.

    Not saying this will be easy or possible without some degree of damage, but trying to
    move the tray from inside before trying to violate the tray to open from the outside
    usually means less damage.

    -Mikkel
     
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