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PCB-mounted contacts for 9V battery

Discussion in 'Electronic Components' started by passerby, Jan 24, 2013.

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  1. passerby

    passerby Guest

    Do you guys know where to order (or even what name to find them by) the little
    contacts (clips?) that the 9V battery plugs into, but in a PCB-mounted
    version. I've seen them on some boards, positive and negative terminals as
    separate parts, positioned 90 degrees to the board (so the battery is parallel
    to the board) and I'd be interested in those, too, but my immediate need is
    something that I can solder flush with the board so that the battery stands on
    its contacts on the PCB. I realize it's not very secure that way but it should
    work for me.

    I've seen TONS of pre-cabled contacts with both positive and negative
    terminals but I'm looking for something that's solderable and does not include
    parting out a connectorized contact.

    Thanks!

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  2. Guest

    Keystone has these in a couple of versions. The first one requires
    something else (usually the enclosure) to keep the battery pushed into
    the contacts:
    http://www.keyelco.com/products/prod02a.asp?SubCategoryID=22

    The second one looks just like the contacts on the top of the 9V
    battery; it will stay reasonably "plugged into" the clips by itself:
    http://www.keyelco.com/products/prod58.asp?SubCategoryID=21

    Digi-Key and Mouser stock at least the "plug in" style.

    Standard disclaimers apply; I don't get money or other consideration
    from any companies mentioned.

    Matt Roberds
     
  3. Guest

    Keystone has several variations. 968 and 967 seem to be closest to
    what you want: http://www.keyelco.com/products/prod29.asp

    The "90 degree" style comes in a couple of versions. The first one
    requires something else (usually the enclosure) to keep the battery
    pushed into the contacts:
    http://www.keyelco.com/products/prod02a.asp?SubCategoryID=22

    The second version looks just like the contacts on the top of the 9V
    battery; it will stay reasonably "plugged into" the clips by itself:
    http://www.keyelco.com/products/prod58.asp?SubCategoryID=21

    Digi-Key and Mouser stock at least some of these contacts.

    Standard disclaimers apply; I don't get money or other consideration
    from any companies mentioned.

    Matt Roberds
     
  4. passerby

    passerby Guest

    responding to
    http://www.electrondepot.com/components/pcb-mounted-contacts-for-9v-battery-33322-.htm
    Thank you for your input! Looks like Keystone is the way to go. I also see the
    exact version I needed - just the snap-on socket and the snap-on stud (and now
    I know how they're called!) as separate components. I will still need to
    figure out how to mount them on the board because they aren't solderable - the
    mount type is shown as "custom" and I believe they are meant to be held in
    place by some sort of a rivet.

    So, that's going to become my next question then - how do you deign a board
    for the .125" rivet? Do you make a .125" hole for it or larger? Will it damage
    the FR board material when it gets squished if the hole is the exact size?
    Does this need to be a plated hole? Do you solder it over after you installed
    the rivet (from the back side, of course)?

    Thanks in advance for all input you can provide on the rivet mounts!

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  5. Guest

    Keystone part numbers 261 and 269?
    I think the rivet problem is why Keystone part numbers 967 and 968 exist.
    They install the rivet for you, and the rivet has a PC pin coming out of
    the bottom. You just need to provide two 0.086" holes on an 0.5" center
    in the board. Note that the insulator will sit not quite flat on the PC
    board, due to the rivets on the bottom side of the insulator. Keystone
    does not specify the gap, but it looks to be on the order of 0.010" to
    0.020" in http://www.keyelco.com/products/specs/spec105.asp .
    Look closely at Keystone's catalog. The contacts that have an 0.125"
    hole are marked as "Senior" size (262 and 270), which is the wrong size
    for a 9 V battery. The "junior" size (261 and 269), for a 9 V battery,
    have a smaller hole.

    There is a single page from an older catalog at
    http://www.keyelco.com/pdfs/M55p22.pdf which shows an 0.093" hole on
    the stud and no data on the socket. Their complete current catalog,
    available from http://www.keyelco.com/products/M60-pdf_download.asp ,
    shows an 0.097" hole on the stud and an 0.096" hole on the socket on
    paper page 30 / PDF page 37. So, you need a rivet that is smaller than
    the hole.

    The eyelets and rivets they have are on PDF page 141 / paper page 134 of
    the complete catalog. Eyelet part numbers 22-27 and 33-37 have a narrow
    enough shank to fit through the hole in the contacts. The length you
    need depends on how thick your board is; remember that some of the
    length will be used up when you round it off when installing. I can't
    tell from the information given whether you want the 22-27 eyelets or
    33-37 eyelets; the eyelet head has to fit inside the battery contact.

    The 3381-3383 and 3384-3387 rivets may also work; their heads will stick
    up more than the eyelets and may not fit as well in the contacts. Again,
    I'm not sure which series you need.
    You pick the size based on the outside diameter of the eyelet or rivet
    you are using. Keystone has recommendations for the eyelets and rivets
    they sell; in general the hole is a little bit bigger than the outside
    diameter of the eyelet or rivet. For instance, for an 0.089" diameter
    eyelet, they call for an 0.093" diameter hole.
    You have to be a little bit careful when you set (squish) the rivet. If
    you set it too hard, then you may damage the board. I think you are
    more likely to damage the board surface or trace than the inside of the
    hole.
    Only if there will be traces connecting to the battery on the same side
    as the battery snaps. If all the traces are on the other side of the
    board from the battery snaps, they don't have to be plated holes.
    I would. Before plated-through holes existed, at least one TV
    manufacturer tried to use rivets to join the traces on one side of the
    circuit board to the other. They were soldered at the factory, but it
    apparently didn't always work that well:
    http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/tvfaq/tvepwoge.htm This might be a good
    job for a 100 W or so "gun" soldering iron, rather than a lower-rated
    "pencil" iron; there's a lot of metal to heat up.

    You will also need some kind of tool to set the rivets; Keystone sells
    them.

    Advice: If you are only making one or a few of this device, the 967 or
    968 clips will be a lot easier to deal with; two PC board holes, two
    pins to solder, done. (You or your PC board assembler will also find
    this easier; you/they *know* how to solder things to a board.) If you
    are making lots of this device, then it may make more sense to use the
    rivet-on contacts. In this case, it might pay to get a sheet of
    unetched circuit board material the same as what you will use in
    production, order a few each of different sized rivets, and try
    attaching the contacts. Then you know what you need before you order a
    bunch, and you can talk to your board assembler about the correct rivet
    technique. Also, if you are making lots of this device, it might be
    worth an email to Keystone to see what they recommend.

    Matt Roberds
     
  6. passerby

    passerby Guest

    responding to
    http://www.electrondepot.com/components/pcb-mounted-contacts-for-9v-battery-33322-.htm
    Thank you for the incredibly detailed answer, Matt. I think I understand the
    situation much better now than when I started! It looks like the 967 clips are
    the way to go for me - the rivets may be doable but require very careful
    consideration but the pre-mounted ones only add less than 2mm to the height
    and I think (need to see one up close first) I can route traces under the
    contacts themselves because they are raised on the fiber insulator - will be
    handy on what should be a very small board. I'll get myself a few to try and
    go from there.
    Thanks again!


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  7. I've seen a few brass rivets used to join 9 volt battery terminals to
    PCBs which all hardened and cracked over time. Thermal cycling should not
    have been an issue for a device that just ran a few LEDs either.

    Little bit of solder fix those things up.
     
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