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PC Audio Wiring Assitance Help.

Discussion in 'Audio' started by Noreaster, Aug 12, 2016.

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  1. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Good day kind folks! ..shameless attempt at soliciting help, via folksie greeting.

    I need some guidance, on a Gigabyte motherboard accessory bracket(See Pict.). I have had to reconstruct the cable motherboard connectors, which go from the bracket's SPDIF Out connections(RCA & TOSLINK), as well as 3x 3.5mm PC audio phono, input jacks.
    [​IMG]
    I need to point out, as the saying goes, I know just enough to be dangerous, but know very little about PC audio.
    The SPDIF connections, are cool, but a little baffled on the audio jacks leads.

    According to the supplier and everything, I have read, the cable should have the following wires connected to the following pins:

    1. Orange
    2. Yellow
    3. Black (a bit wider)
    4. Empty
    5. Red
    6. Green
    7. Black
    8. Purple

    In looking at the stock photo above, for this bracket, you can clearly see all the wires. However, this picture, to follow, is what I find, when I peeled back the cable's outer sheathing.

    [​IMG]

    Now, there is no second black wire for pin #3, but, there is just loose strands, which in this picture is the furthest to the right. Is this considered a ground? Again, looking at the first image, the wires entering the connector are as described, including a larger diameter black wire.

    Could they have spliced the loose strands with a black insulated wire and, the splice, is just hidden under the heat shrink tube? Is this what I am missing? Should I do the same, and then slap a pin on it and use it for pin #3?

    Obviously, Oblivious to the ins and outs.

    Thanks Folks!

    Cheers,
    Rich
     
  2. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Bare wire is usually indicative of a shield connection which is typically connected to chassis ground.

    Chris

    EDIT: Oops! I forgot to say ...Welcome To Electronics Point!
     
  3. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Thanks Chris! and, thanks for the information. So, what do you think? Do I treat that as the ground for pin #3?
     
  4. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Hi Rich, before I commit myself to an answer that may be wrong could you please post the links to where you obtained the stock photo and the pin-outs? For that matter any links to this product would be helpful. I really don't want to give you erroneous advice.

    I did do my own search and found this at Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0035J9Z7W/?tag=stackoverfl08-20
    It provides pinouts for Gigabyte and other mother boards.

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  5. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Chris, thank you, I will provide all the links for you. FYI, the information regarding the bracket, is sparse, but I'll include what I have found.

    Thank you again, Once this is cleared up, I'll be able to button up the case.

    Much Appreciated, my friend'
    Rich

    look for post with links later today or evening (EST)
     
  6. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    I found the wiring diagram below on the Gigabyte website:

    [​IMG]
    Unfortunately, the pin-outs don't jibe with your picture. Looks like there is a 3-pin power connector missing.
     
  7. Noreaster

    Noreaster

    14
    2
    Aug 11, 2016
    Yes, close, but bracket is part# 12CR1-1SPAUD-21



    [​IMG]


    Motherboard is GA-78LMT-USB3
    Here are pinouts for F_Audio header
    [​IMG]
    Current Default PIN config is for HD Audio on MB and Apevia X-Qpack3 Case's front audio. I was planning on disconnecting the cablw between the F_audio header on MB and the Front control panel itself, by unplugging the cable at the MB header, thus giving a header location to connect the new cable in question(3x 3.5mm audio jacks), from the new bracket to the MB. Essentially relocating/rep;icationg the F_audio inputs from the front of the machine to now, the back.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2016
  8. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Oops! My bad. I must have transposed -21 into -12 when I copied it from your image post. So, it looks like you have analog audio on six wires plus a ground (the uninsulated strands of wire in your cable). Now what? Play some music and use an ear-bud (or an o'scope) to find where it comes out before attaching the wires to a connector? IIRC there is some software that allows you test (setup) audio channels, maybe downloadable from the Gigabyte website or on a CD-ROM that came with the mobo. Where do you go from here?

    Oh, although Chris beat me to it... welcome to Electronics Point!
     
  9. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Ahhh, Danke vo Velcommin! (I have no idea, if that is correct German, I tend to make up my own version., lol) Anyway thanks for the welcome.

    First off, no scope, but that will change eventually. I intend to learn. Also purchased Arduino kit, which I am itching to dive into. Anyway...

    Ok, you lost me a little here. As my tagline explains, "I'm trying to think, but nothing happens"). can you elaborate more on the music / earbud procedure? Perhaps a nice slick PowerPoint Presentation, I'll make the popcorn. I am kidding of course. ...unless. No, No, but I think I do need a little more rudimentary explanation on the procedure. I get why, but not how.

    I so much appreciate your time and instruction.
    Rich
     
  10. Noreaster

    Noreaster

    14
    2
    Aug 11, 2016
    Hey Chris, sorry for the delays, yes, the bracket is offered by Gigabyte Motherboards as accessory add-ons. The bracket, I am referring to is P/N 12CR1-1SPAUD-21 This is both SPDIF_Out & 8 Channel Audio Out. The link to the accessory page is http://www.gigabyte.com/support-downloads/accessory.aspx On that page, you can click on the pinouts for any of their brackets. But the link to the pinouts is: http://www.gigabyte.com/MicroSite/12/2-eng.jpg

    I have also created a little synopsis, showing the issue as well. I will embed it as an image, as well as include it as an attachment.

    [​IMG]

    I really appreciate, any guidance on this. It is holding up a Home Theater build.

    Thank You, Chris,
    Rich
     

    Attached Files:

  11. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Rich, my best educated guess is that the heaver black wire that you don't seem to have is the bare wire that's integral to shielded cables that are manufactured with a foil shield instead of the braided type. Foil type shielded cable utilize a bare wire that makes contact with the foil its entire length. It's common (SOP) industry practice to insulate the bare wire using heat shrink tubing. I believe that that's what appears to be the "heaver black wire".

    Capice?
    Chris
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  12. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Rich, I agree 100% with Chris: the missing "heavier black wire" is actually the foil-shield "drain" wire, the "loose bare strands" you discovered. And, yes, you do need it. It forms the "common" connection for all the audio channels.

    A foil-shield is actually two layers, an inner aluminum foil and a thin outer plastic wrap that protects the foil. Visit this Belden PDF article for pictures and more information. The "drain" wire is normally laid between the foil and the inner insulated conductors, after which both the foil layer and plastic layer are tightly "Z-wrapped" around the wire bundle before the outer plastic jacket is applied.

    Less expensive cables do not use a foil shield at all, but simply wrap the inner conductors with several strands of thin copper wire in a spiral pattern. This may be the type of cable you have. Belden takes the copper spiral wrap one step further with their patented French Wrap that uses a weaving spiral wrap. In either case, foil or no foil, the drain wire is there.

    It is customary when terminating either type of shielded cable to place a short length of shrink tubing over the drain wire before attaching it to the connector. Some audio cables (RCA plugs typically) use a braided shielded cable. These do not usually incorporate a drain wire, so different techniques are used to electrically attach the braid to a connector, including "combing out" the braid to form a single twisted wire conductor. The end of the intact braid is often soldered directly to the outer shell of RCA-type plugs, after cutting it back far enough to allow the single insulated inner conductor to be inserted and soldered to the central male pin. Shrink tubing is then usually applied over the braid and RCA plug to protect the soldered braid connection.
     
    CDRIVE likes this.
  13. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Ah, Grazie mia Compadres, ho capito. I Capice.

    This Cable does have the foil. Thinking back now, that may have been a key bullet point to mention. Anyway, so, to confirm, my next steps here. I should take a short length of coated wire and joint/solder it to the bare strand wires, which I would twisted together, and then add a section of heat shrink tubing to insulate the new wire, along with the rest of the wires and now, I have my 7 wires with 7 pins.

    Brilliante', Grazie Mille!

    Thank you both, very much, for all the great information. I will certainly be looking at the Belden website and find that PDF, Mr. Evans. Now, I can finally move onto the next step and finish this build.

    What's next? I will be attempting, to reconfigure the pins and connectors of this bracket to create, sort of a daughter bracket or companion bracket to a Creative Sound Blaster, PCI sound card.

    So, if you should hear a distant explosion and some faint sirens, you'll know it was me. And, if I may impose upon you gents, just in case, you do not hear the corresponding sirens, would you mind making a quick call to 911... lol.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016
    hevans1944 likes this.
  14. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Molto bene but I don't see why you need to graft a length of insulated wire to it. Your photo indicates more than enough length as it is. Judging from your photo I would cut all the other conductors to near the length of the bare (GND) wire.This assumes you haven't connected any of them to the connector yet.;)

    Chris
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  15. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Ok, yes, I had initially trimmed back the sheathing just to be sure that we hadn't cut a wire in error. So, just crimp / solder the pin onto the bare wire?

    Sweet, even easier.
    I really am gonna delve into some training in electronics.
    Thanks again, Chris,
    Rich
     
  16. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    It's desirable to cover it with shrink tubing just slightly larger than the bare twisted wire, and push this tubing up under the outer jacket after shrinking it, before attaching the end of the wire to a connector pin. You can leave the shrink tubing a few millimeters longer than the wire (it will contract some as it shrinks) and then trim it with a single-edged razor blade to expose just enough bare wire to solder or crimp to your connector pin. It also doesn't hurt to cut a short piece of shrink tubing to fit over the cable jacket and shrink this down after your connector is attached. Makes for a nicer, professional-looking, appearance. You have to remember to do this FIRST though, or the wires with pins attached might not fit through the un-shrinked tubing!:D
     
  17. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Hop is being optimistic when he said "might not fit...". I'll be a tad bolder and say it won't fit. :p

    It brings back a memory that's nearly 50 years old. It was my first electronics position working at a civilian owned (3rd echelon and up) military repair & refurbish depot. Most of the stuff that passed through this place were ARC34 and TRAC75 transceivers.

    Anyway, my supervisor came by our test benches and asked which one of you thinks he can solder up both ends of ~ 50 pin Anphenol connector / cable and have it pass Mil Spec QC inspection? Well long story short I volunteered. When finished I was extremely impressed with myself, as there was absolutely no singed insulation and all my joints were text book beautiful. My supervisor was impressed too until he realized that I had forgotten to slip the lock collars over the cable before I started the soldering!:eek:

    Chris
     
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  18. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Rich, my reminiscing caused me to forget to tell you where to get heat shrink tubing. Though I will never be the King of Reminiscence here. Hop holds that undisputed "Super Heavyweight" title. :D

    Anyway, you can get some on Ebay or Radio Shack (if they still sell it) and you can use your wife's hair drier to shrink it.

    Chris
     
  19. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Ace (The Handyman Place) Hardware sells shrink tubing at exorbitant prices, but if you need it...
    Also auto parts stores like NAPA and AutoZone and many others, but eBay is probably the cheapest if you can tolerate the wait for it to arrive.
     
  20. Noreaster

    Noreaster

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    Aug 11, 2016
    Once more Masters. I thank you both for the continued support. Fortunately, I anticipated the need and ordered tubing, when I ordered, new connectors. Oh, that reminds me, regarding the "key" position in a connector. I understand, they are not necessarily required and I won't be using any here in this scenario, but do they actually sell these "Key" fillers, or blanks? What would they be called?

    Chris, I think, we all have a good story to regale about our early days. This one actually won me the "HASP" award at the Bank of Hartford", in Connecticut. It came with a certificate, a trophy of a horses backside and a small ceremony. The trophy was engraved, and all, it was quite impressive. Of course, I was embarrassed at the time, but can laugh now. I still have that somewhere.

    This was back, in the early days of PC's, where you had dual 5.25" drives, a monochrome monitor and, I swear, an actual switch on the back of the system to go from 8mHz to "Turbo" mode of 16 and the rig, back then, from IBM, ran you about $3,000. A 10 megabyte hard drive was the next tech. advancement to come.

    I was hired as a Project Manager for PC integration into the Bank and we were also to become the test site for our data center, which was a company called Connecticut Online, which served nearly 90% of the Banking industry's data processing and storage needs, for the state, back then. Up til then, everything was handled by NCR minis connected to the mains at the data center.

    So, enter PC Operations. The day came, when we were setting up a new PC, by the modem and the other NCR equipment. That day, I was going to be conversing with PC techs over at Connecticut On-Line for the next hour or so.. Now, my desk and the nearest telephone, as it were, was located about 20 feet away, so in the beginning, I was doing a lot of back and forth, between the new PC and the phone, and from the phone, to the PC, and so on. At some point, I finally got fed up, from all the back & forth and located an old basic telephone and located a phone jack where there was no activity going on and swapped out the phone cords. Much more convenient. After about an hour, it is time to test everything out. We fire up the PC and the modem and after several minutes of adjusting some settings and tweaking, this and that, we get the modem and PC talking. Remember now, this was back in DOS days and in a lot of cases, back then, settings were oftened changed by the physical manipulation of jumpers, etc. No plug & play back then. Ok, so now, we are ready to connect to the data center. The modem, begins to dial (Yes dial!), and off we...nope, nothing. None of that familiar screech or dings. Nuts, we now spent, the next hour and forty-five minutes troubleshooting and going through the check list The result, still nothing. I was about 10 minutes away from calling the telco, and having them come out, when on about our third time through the check list, when on item #4 on the list... "Make sure all cable and cords are security fastened", it FINNALY dawned on me,, that I had borrowed a phone jack, in order to make conversations with the data center, more convenient.

    ...For the past hour & forty-five minutes, I have been talking, all along, on the very phone line, we were trying to use.

    Fortunately, all had a sense of humor about it, but about a week later, the boys from Connecticut On-Line and several of my Cohorts at The Bank of Hartford, put together a little presentation ceremony and I was awarded the "HASP", or "Half-Assed Systems Person" award. A month later, as the word spread, a telephone was installed at that station, and a little plaque of dedication to me, was affixed next to the phone. EVERYBODY's a Comedian. The worst part... The first two times through the checklist, I actually checked the phone line connection, remembering, only, that I originally had plugged that modem tel. line into the wall. And obviously spaced out on the whole unplugging thing.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
    hevans1944 likes this.
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