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Parts ordering process.

Discussion in 'CAD' started by [email protected], Jun 22, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    Does there exist any distributor/manufactor "interface" such that one can
    supply generic specifications on components like
    "R=27.4k Tolerance=1% P=0.25W RoHS" and get stock/leadtime + priceing info
    returned ..?
    Web interfaces can be screenscraped, but it's not optimal.
    Parametric search via web is good step. But it's not there.

    All this without haveing to look manually. Which is not fun for any list with
    50+ components.

    The process could be something like:
    Make schematic with electrical specifications, no footprint values.
    Send request to distributor for the generic component specification.
    Use returned:
    footprint as parameter to pcb layout.
    priceing info for budget estimations.
    stock/leadtime for showstopper alerts.
    Let pcb layout program do make a layout with the retrieved footprints/pinout.
    Send to fabrication etc..
     
  2. wrote:
    : Does there exist any distributor/manufactor "interface" such that one can
    : supply generic specifications on components like
    : "R=27.4k Tolerance=1% P=0.25W RoHS" and get stock/leadtime + priceing info
    : returned ..?

    DigiKey provides the best web search interface, allowing you to input
    your desired component specs, and returning price, stock, etc.
    www.newarkinone.com is a trailing second best, if you can figure out
    how to get to their parametric search page. Mouser, a distributor who
    I used to like, is terrible since they have no parametric search
    ability.

    : Web interfaces can be screenscraped, but it's not optimal.
    : Parametric search via web is good step. But it's not there.

    : All this without haveing to look manually. Which is not fun for any list with
    : 50+ components.

    That's why real companies have procurement departments, with
    electronics buyers -- specialists who buy parts off BOMs all day
    long. It's not easy. And wait until you need to start managing
    procurement lead times to schedule a build ....

    Stuart
     
  3. Chuck Harris

    Chuck Harris Guest

    On the other hand, Mouser always returns a price that is 5 to 15% lower
    than Newark, and 2-5% lower than DigiKey. Plus they charge no handling
    fees on UPS and FedEX shipping, and no shipping charges on backorders, and
    have no minimum order.
     
  4. Guest

    Only need to make a bot that can find components at digikey to get all the
    advantages then .. :)

    Oh btw.. makes me curious why digikey don't have min qty/price sorting as
    choices in their parametric search..
     
  5. : Stuart Brorson wrote:

    :> DigiKey provides the best web search interface, allowing you to input
    :> your desired component specs, and returning price, stock, etc.
    :> www.newarkinone.com is a trailing second best, if you can figure out
    :> how to get to their parametric search page. Mouser, a distributor who
    :> I used to like, is terrible since they have no parametric search
    :> ability.

    : On the other hand, Mouser always returns a price that is 5 to 15% lower
    : than Newark, and 2-5% lower than DigiKey. Plus they charge no handling
    : fees on UPS and FedEX shipping, and no shipping charges on backorders, and
    : have no minimum order.

    True enough. But OP asked about web search ability, not price.

    Anway, if you are into lower prices, the big distributors like Arrow &
    Avnet are the way to go, particularly if you are buying parts on a
    commerical basis.

    Stuart
     
  6. Chuck Harris

    Chuck Harris Guest

    Arrow generally is only better in price if you get into larger quantities.
    When you need quantities, and Mouser is too high, go to their parent company TTI.

    I am not sure what is bothering you about Mouser's search engine. If I want a
    1K resistor, I can search on 1K resistor, and I get a whole slew of parts. Has
    Digi-Key done something special lately?

    -Chuck
     
  7. Guest

    Arrow generally is only better in price if you get into larger quantities.
    Most non digikey/mouser/rs-components/farnell etc.. are very cumbersome to
    deal with unless your doing 1k+ orders.

    (Guess that's one of the reasons sw side tend be more "alive" than hw. Due
    that barrier of entry is lower. This might affect future recruitment.)
    When I search digikey, I get a paramtric search so I can _quickly_ optimize
    the component values I need vs what's available. When I do the same at mouser.
    There's no sorting but you rather get a complex list of what's available.
    Unlike digikeys straightforward table with what's available.
    Farnell have a similar scheme.

    I like being able to specify "cap cer .47uF InStock RoHS Lead" get a listing
    with parameters. Where I select the most important first and narrows the list
    of components down to the one that fits specification/cost best.

    Products that seems hard to find is low-profile gigabit transformers, smps
    transformers, smd connectors, partly gigabit phy etc..
    Then you have to somehow interact with these 1k+ shops. Which means you get
    4 samples or have to buy 1k+ chips..

    Google have already been clued on this with their google-api. I find it
    stoneagestyle that people have to spend time to match their bom list by hand
    to distributors. It should be an automatic, or at least semiautomatic process.
     
  8. How do you search on P-channel MOSFETs in TO-252 good for between 50V
    and 100V?



    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  9. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    I bet you would be amazed just how many companies there are out there where,
    to purchase prototype parts, the engineer sits around, creating a parts list
    at, e.g., DigiKey or Mouser to insure that stock is available and find
    alternative parts if need be... and then prints this out to give to a
    purchasing department that keys it again a second time!
     
  10. Guest

    It should be possible to solve. And until distributors get clued. One should
    be able to construct bots/screenscrapers to accomplish automatic bom keying.
     
  11. wrote:
    :>:>> Google have already been clued on this with their google-api. I find it
    :>> stoneagestyle that people have to spend time to match their bom list by hand
    :>> to distributors. It should be an automatic, or at least semiautomatic
    :>> process.

    :>I bet you would be amazed just how many companies there are out there where,
    :>to purchase prototype parts, the engineer sits around, creating a parts list
    :>at, e.g., DigiKey or Mouser to insure that stock is available and find
    :>alternative parts if need be... and then prints this out to give to a
    :>purchasing department that keys it again a second time!

    I'm not amazed at all. It sounds like my life, except that I do this
    for *two* procurement departments. First, I do it for the group
    responsible for prototype procurement. Then I do it again for the
    group responsible for production procurement.

    : It should be possible to solve. And until distributors get clued. One should
    : be able to construct bots/screenscrapers to accomplish automatic bom keying.

    Actually, this isn't nearly enough. For one thing, only a small
    handful of vendors report availability on their public websites. And
    the reported quantities aren't necessarily accurate.

    More vendors appear on special databases which you can access (over
    the net) if you are a large commerical entity who buys lots of parts.
    I believe these databases are more accurate and complete, but that's
    the business of our procurement departments, not mine. I don't know
    what policies govern the use of these special databases.

    My impression of the electronics procurement/logistics business is
    that it is indeed ripe for some kind of reporting standard and a SOAP
    or XML based set of tools which can be used to access and search the
    vendor databases. However, it's unlikely the big distributors would
    like that, since obscurantism allows them to maintain control over
    your purchases through them. That is, if I can clearly see that
    Vendor A has 1000 parts at one price, Vendor B has 10,000 of the same
    part at a different price, and vendor C has 1,000,000 of the part at a
    third price, then they have nothing to compete on other than price,
    and no vendor wants that.

    Stuart
     
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