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Parts management

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by db, Feb 15, 2004.

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  1. db

    db Guest

    As I am doing more electronics projects and acquiring more parts I am
    starting to
    run into a parts management problem. This is particularly a problem
    with smds. Up to now it has been sufficient keep parts in ziploc bags.
    With parts from digikey , I put the extra label on the bag I am
    storing in. Still this method is becoming inadequate.

    I was just wondering how others maintain their parts so they can find
    them when they need them or know if they have what they need on hand.
    SMDs are particularly annoying because the space to store the part is
    many times larger than the part itself.
     
  2. Ian Stirling

    Ian Stirling Guest

    Why?
    Order a thousand of the same size of bags (preferrably antistatic).
    Then chop up some card with a guillotine, so that the bags stay upright.
    If you don't have a label, write on the card.
    Now, simply arrange a divider in a drawer, so that the bags can flip back
    and forth.
     
  3. I have a two dimensional array of plastic containers with lid.

    For example http://www.distrelec.com search for 300700,
    manufacturer unknown.

    Rene
     
  4. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Get yourself some parts cabinets



    and label the drawers using Cartesian coordinates as if they were in the
    upper right hand quadrant. That is, the drawer at the bottom left corner
    would be 0,0, the one immediately above it 0,1, the one to its
    immediate right 1,0, etc. (That way you can grow vertically and
    horizontally and easily keep track of the drawer "addresses") Then make
    a spreadsheet with the drawer numbers and their contents, and you'll be
    able to find anything you have by searching for contents and then
    reading off the drawer's address.
     
  5. This reminds me of an old Isaac Asimov story about a civilization grinding
    to a halt because they lost the 'index' to their database. What was that
    story called? I can't remember, but I believe it was in an anthology called
    "Asimov's Mysteries" which, ironically, I can't find a table of contents for
    on the web...
     
  6. Guy Macon

    Guy Macon Guest

    Use four variables (0,0,0,1 etc.) from the start with the first two
    alway 0 and it scales to an entire warehouse.
     
  7. Guest

    Put the parts in small anti-stat bags. I think Digi-Key ships them that
    way already. Then put the bags into a hanging file folder. You can
    further sub-divide into individual manila folders. Just write the part
    names / values on the folder tabs.

    For a small project with less than 100 part types this will work OK.
    The folders can be re-ordered a lot easier than part drawers.

    Buckworth
     
  8. I read in sci.electronics.design that Robert C Monsen
    I can't find it in 'Asimov's Mysteries'.
     
  9. Roger Gt

    Roger Gt Guest

    : I read in sci.electronics.design that Robert C Monsen
    <[email protected]_s54>)
    : about 'Parts management', on Sun, 15 Feb 2004:
    : >This reminds me of an old Isaac Asimov story about a
    civilization
    : >grinding to a halt because they lost the 'index' to their
    database. What
    : >was that story called? I can't remember, but I believe it was
    in an
    : >anthology called "Asimov's Mysteries" which, ironically, I
    can't find a
    : >table of contents for on the web...
    :
    : I can't find it in 'Asimov's Mysteries'.
    : --
    : Regards, John Woodgate, OOO - Own Opinions Only.

    I remember the tale, but not where I read it!
     

  10. Googling eventually turned up this, which appears to show it wasn't by
    Asimov but based on his Foundation charcters. Here's the similar
    enquiry and its reply:
    -------
    Lori Lathrop wrote...
    The story your friend is looking for is called "The Originist" by
    Orson Scott Card. I read it in a volume called "Foundation's Friends"
    edited by Martin H. Greenberg published by

    Tom Doherty Associates, inc.
    49 West 24 Street
    New York, NY 10010

    A very entertaining and thought provoking story.... and homage to Dr.
    Asimov.

    Mike Riley
    Sr. Systems Analyst
    Preservation Resources

     
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