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Part identification

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by JoeM, Sep 13, 2014.

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  1. JoeM

    JoeM

    33
    9
    Sep 5, 2014
    I have a few of these, what look like photo type devices. I put an ohm meter on them and could not measure any changes due to light level. Anyone have any idea of what these actually are and how they work? They are very small, and the one corner you can't see due to glare, has an 8 on it. Top and bottom pictures are courtesy of a microscope camera I bought a long time ago and never thought to use it until now. It has LED's in a ring around the base to light the surface. Just because someone might have an interest in knowing the magnification level of this microscope camera, I took a picture of my finger print. It also shoots video. The last time I tried it I looked a bugs. I live in Florida so they are very easy to find.
     

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  2. chopnhack

    chopnhack

    1,573
    352
    Apr 28, 2014
    Howdy neighbor :)

    I had seen an instructable(?) some time ago how they were making cheap microscopes with a lens and a cheap digital camera... pretty cool.
    If I had to guess, I would say it looks like a SMD led - take it for what its worth, I am probably wrong ;-)
     
  3. JoeM

    JoeM

    33
    9
    Sep 5, 2014
    I didn't think of that because it's mounted in metal. I will take a closer look and run a diode test on it. Ok, did that, nothing between any of the pins. But in ohms, between two sets of pins I get very erratic ohms readings that jump all over the place. It is obvious from the way it has a window on it that it is some sort of optical device, Running the small voltage of diode test does nothing, but a second look with a very bright light tells me that they may be some kind of special photo resistor. They are not as stable as the other photo resistors I have. and they have 4 leads. I managed to get M ohms at high brightness, and K, or less on low brightness, but never could get a stable reading on it in any way. Oh well, it might be a good puzzle for a bread board project one night.
     
  4. chopnhack

    chopnhack

    1,573
    352
    Apr 28, 2014
    Maybe its designed to respond to a specific spectrum of light?
     
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