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p5-75 boot issues

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Oct 25, 2012.

  1. Guest

    My old 1995 GW2k P5-75 doesn't boot right.
    First clue is the clock is at zero, so batt is dead.
    But it requires me to get in and out of setup to get it to boot.

    Is there any workaround, even if I don't replace the battery?


    - = -
    Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
    http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm
    ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
    [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
    [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
     
  2. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest


    This ancient pc I'm using here , the batt I bridged across with large ZnO
    batteries and diode years ago .
    Soldered on eires with pc power off but battery in place , otherwise a hell
    of a work up to remove the original. A couple of years ago had to replace
    those batreries and enough charge in the original to maintain data while
    swapping batteries
     
  3. No, because it's not only losing the date and time, it's losing the CMOS
    settings, which is why it asks you to run setup each time you boot.

    What's so difficult about changing the battery?
     
  4. Baron

    Baron Guest

    Mike Tomlinson Inscribed thus:
    Probably because the battery is built into the Dallas clock chip.
     
  5. Ian Malcolm

    Ian Malcolm Guest

    No more than moderately annoying to do if the chip is socketed and you
    have a Dremel.
    <http://www.mcamafia.de/mcapage0/dsrework.htm>
     
  6. Which is not difficult to change either.
     
  7. Adrian C

    Adrian C Guest

    Recesses of me mind dug up an old memory of some motherboards having
    external connections to wire a battery, where the orginal inbuilt one
    had died.

    Ah, here goes....

    http://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=4318
     
  8. Guest

    I no longer worry about such things. I just never reboot. Maybe I'n lucky because my systemns are nice and stable, I let them run for months. Lessee, in the last almost year, this one has been rebooted about five times. The basement PC more like three times, and one of those was to install the wireless.

    Really if you just turn the monitor off you should be fine, and in fact IIRC I DID take the battery out of this one. The only time it nags me is when the power goes out. That happened once when vacuuming the floor.

    I see no reason to rebooot a desktop. A laptop is different because of cooling issues and of course if you run off the battery.

    I forget why I took the battery out, I think it was because I suspected a BIOS virus.

    Anyway, you might have an 800 or 1,000 watt PS in it, but it doesn't pull that much power.

    J
     
  9. Guest

    Much obliged.

    Well, there's another PC and some disk drawers over the computer, so..

    I WILL open it, but is there any chance I can find the Gateway2000 P5-75
    schematics and battery specs online before I do so I can put it all back the same day?



    - = -
    Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
    http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm
    ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
    [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
    [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
     
  10. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    On Tuesday, November 13, 2012 2:35:37 PM UTC-8, wrote:
    [dead CMOS battery]
    Gateway, P5-75, and probably Gateway 2000, are all ambiguous; you cannot
    really tell what the motherboard uses without an exact model number
    of the (probably Intel) motherboard.

    What you CAN do, is get to Radio Shack and buy a coin cell (CR2032) and
    an alkaline 4.5v (#840) and maybe a 1/2AA (#5150) lithium cell, and
    after you see the innards and plop in the battery you need, take
    the others back to the store for a refund. For ten-year-old hardware,
    those three possibilities cover almost every desktop computer.

    Two caveats: if the old battery is leaking corrosive goo, you will have
    to clean that up. And, the replacement sometimes does NOT LOOK LIKE the
    original battery (look for a labeled socket that fits a pigtail on the alkaline
    battery, and use the handy velcro on the battery to attach it ... somwhere).
     
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