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OT? Noiseless Single-photon Amplification Demonstrated

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], Nov 12, 2012.

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  1. Guest

    Some regulars here seem to think that physicists never ome up with
    anything practical:

    http://phys.org/news/2012-11-noiseless-photon-amplifier.html#jCp

    "Research physicists have demonstrated the first device capable of
    amplifying the information in a single particle of light without
    adding noise.

    "The research collaboration, involving Griffith University, The
    University of Queensland and University of Science and Technology of
    China, was able to amplify the noisy quantum state of a single photon
    subjected to loss, without adding noise in the process; in fact, their
    amplification reduced the noise in the quantum state."

    There's a lot of "fancy stuff" involving quantum teleportation and
    so on, and it's touted as being applicable to quantum encryption, but
    I'm sure some bright boy (or girl) will figure out how to apply the
    principle to ordinary photonics and maybe prosaic optics like
    microscopes.


    Mark L. Fergerson
     
  2. There is the theorem by Caves that phase-independent linear
    amplification always adds noise, and this has been traditionally
    circumvented by parametric amplification which is phase-dependent.
    But now this is something different. They claim non-deteministic
    noiseless amplification. I would have equated non-determinism
    with noise! Apparently they use something more shrewd.
    Interesting.

    Regards,
    Mikko
     
  3. Les Cargill

    Les Cargill Guest


    Does that then mean you can't put two of these in series for more "gain"?
     
  4. First I didn't know that about parametric amps, so thanks.

    In quantum things the amount of noise can depend on the coupling.
    (I'm thinking of this paper by Rolf Landauer on noise.)

    Say does a maser add noise?

    George H.

    Apparently they use something more shrewd.
     
  5. Ouch, Phil, you lost me on the last part. I got the Poisson/ Gaussian
    bit,
    (some averaging can turn Poisson to Gaussian, no?)
    But what's N?

    George H.
     
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