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OT Fahrenheit

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Terry, Nov 8, 2006.

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  1. krw

    krw Guest

    Those were all designed for office environments. Mainframes most
    certainly were not, and it had nothing to do with paper (I/O was
    seldom in the same room).
     
  2. Guest

    I was region support for the 4300 and the 138, 148. I don't know of
    ONE 370 138/148 customer who went for the 3031
    It basically WAS a 158 (as were the service directors) so there would
    be no advantage to go 158 to 3031
    I was also trained on both the 158 and 3031.

    After my time but I bet it is.
    CE, Support Specialist then later IPR and Contract Services.
     
  3. Guest

    If you bring a pallet of paper in from outside in Florida (80-90 RH)
    and put it in a 3800 it will wad up so bad you can't stack more than
    about 200 pages without taking it out. Forget trying to run it through
    the burster.
    They usually tried to keep it in the A/C for several days before using
    it.
     
  4. Guest

    We had a bunch of them but I tried to stay away from them. When they
    merged GSD and FE it got harder to do. I ended up working on the 3x
    and was trained on the RS6000 and AS/400. I was the 7800 (TP support)
    guy so mostly I did the communication end.
    All of those boxes were basically solid except the DASD and that was
    just a software nightmare, not a hardware problem. Once they started
    using RAID5 they were a no brainer.
    My boss had a real sense of humor and sent me to Series 1 school the
    week after I got back from 3090 support school. It was the only school
    I walked out of.
     
  5. Guest

    Any of the air cooled machines could run damn near anywhere. When I
    got to Florida (From the glass house data centers of DC) I saw it
    happening. A "computer room" was a bay in a strip mall or industrial
    center. That was also the first time I ran into red leg delta power
    and the first time I saw "no raised floor" since the 1401 and mod 30
    days.
     
  6. krw

    krw Guest

    The channel directors off loaded all the I/O microcode. The 3031
    was significantly faster than a 3158 because of the director. IIRC
    they were pretty cheap too.
    It's not after mine. ;-) Nope. /360 is hardly RISC. THe
    processor complex is an MCM.
     
  7. Doug Miller

    Doug Miller Guest

    I'll give you five examples:
    1) Peat Marwick Mitchell datacenter, early 70's
    An airconditioner failure caused DASD (2314) data
    errors at exactly 94 degrees on their wall thermometer.
    Ran fine at 93.[/QUOTE]

    Reminds me of an incident that occurred in the late 80s/early 90s when I
    worked for the Navy. I managed a Tandem TXP system that shared a computer room
    with a Honeywell 66. One holiday weekend, the air conditioning system failed
    in the wee hours of Saturday morning after the second shift operators had gone
    home. (There was no third shift.) Monday being a holiday, the problem wasn't
    discovered until the first shift operators arrived at about 6am Tuesday to
    find the data center at about 110 degrees. The Honeywell had gone down only
    about three hours after the air conditioning did... but the Tandem was still
    up. The DASD cabinets were painfully hot to the touch, and one of the drives
    had gone down -- but since Tandem uses mirrored drives, and the mirror was
    still ok, it did no harm. I measured the exhaust air at the back of the
    processor cabinet at 134 degrees... but the Tandem was still up.
     
  8. T

    T Guest

    Actually we had lots of big iron at the Retro Computing Society of Rhode
    Island. The KL10 was a big beast. Interestingly the collection seriously
    lacked IBM big iron.
     
  9. T

    T Guest

    We stipulated a raised floor because we could. And it has come in handy,
    from snaking a power whip over to the telephone switch (An Avaya
    Prologix) or running network cabling to server racks, etc.

    http://blip.tv/file/67664
     
  10. T

    T Guest

    Reminds me of an incident that occurred in the late 80s/early 90s when I
    worked for the Navy. I managed a Tandem TXP system that shared a computer room
    with a Honeywell 66. One holiday weekend, the air conditioning system failed
    in the wee hours of Saturday morning after the second shift operators had gone
    home. (There was no third shift.) Monday being a holiday, the problem wasn't
    discovered until the first shift operators arrived at about 6am Tuesday to
    find the data center at about 110 degrees. The Honeywell had gone down only
    about three hours after the air conditioning did... but the Tandem was still
    up. The DASD cabinets were painfully hot to the touch, and one of the drives
    had gone down -- but since Tandem uses mirrored drives, and the mirror was
    still ok, it did no harm. I measured the exhaust air at the back of the
    processor cabinet at 134 degrees... but the Tandem was still up.
    [/QUOTE]

    Back in 1993 I was responsible for managing a Data General MV9600U
    running AOS/VS II. Loved that machine, and still remember alot about it.

    In any case, these were machines that could take abuse. We knew of one
    located in a non-ventilated closet that just continued to run until
    decommissioning day.
     
  11. Guest


    You can recomend anything you like but the salesman is not going to
    leave the money on the table if the customer says no, particularly
    when it says it is not required in the sales manual.
     
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