Connect with us

OT: dB$

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Paul Hovnanian P.E., Sep 14, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. When negotiating a raise or contract terms, how should one express dB
    gain?

    As: 20*log( New $ rate/ Current $ rate ) i.e. as a magnitude
    ratio

    Or: 10*log( New $ rate / Current $ rate ) i.e. as a power ratio

    Either way, I anticipate operating into a very high impedance.
     
  2. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    Watch out for standing waves.

    Ken
     
  3. Tim Wescott

    Tim Wescott Guest

    Careful, that kind of talk could bounce back to you later.
     
  4. I read in sci.electronics.design that Paul Hovnanian P.E.
    It's obvious. Money is power.
     
  5. 20Log(N$/O$), since it's a pretax number. Your accountant (and any SO)
    will see 10Log(N$/O$).
     
  6. Ken Taylor

    Ken Taylor Guest

    Ouch! :) Clearly there's a law that says smart alec responses are a
    continuing series.

    Ken
     
  7. I thought Knowledge is Power. And Time is Money.

    Since Work = Power * Time

    Substituting variables, we get:

    Work = Knowledge * Money

    or:

    Money = Work / Knowledge

    So, the less you know, the more you get paid for the same amount of
    work.

    (originally discovered by Scott Adams)
     
  8. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    One shouldn't, in those circumstances.
    Why does this not surprise me? ;-P

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  9. Definitely not. Or do you tolerate -3dB less payment ?

    Rene
     
  10. I read in sci.electronics.design that Rene Tschaggelar <>
    wrote (in <432943b1$0$1154$>) about 'OT: dB$',
    For me, it's frequency dependent. If you want to pay at lower
    frequencies, you have to pay more. 30 days net, 60 days +0.4 dB, 90 days
    + 0.8 dB.
     
  11. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  12. John Fields wrote...
    ROFLOL.
     
  13. I read in sci.electronics.design that John Fields
    That way, half the money stays at the source. The Maximum Dollar Theorem
    is a trap for the unwary. One of the two best arrangements for 'maximum
    $$ received' is like an audio amp output - near zero source impedance
    and load impedance 10 to 100 times higher. The other is its dual.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-