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opinion on power supply design workshop

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by panfilero, Aug 13, 2013.

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  1. panfilero

    panfilero Guest

    I found this power supply design workshop on the web, I thought it sounded pretty good and am entertaining the idea of signing up for it. I've never attended a workshop like this before, and it is a bit pricey. I was wondering what people's thoughts are on workshops, or if this workshop sounds good? I'm fairly new (less than 5 years) to power supply design and want to learn more about it, I've designed a few, I'm familiar with the topologies, wrestle through compensation and magnetics design. A link to the workshop is below. thanks

    http://www.ridleyengineering.com/workshops.html
     
  2. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    AFAICT Ridley has a good reputation and that's a fairly normal price for
    a four-day hands-on seminar. I wouldn't really need it because I've done
    so many power converters that they come out of my ears by now. But if
    you are fairly new to this stuff it could be worthwhile. What is very
    important is to find out what and how much background is needed for this
    course and to make sure you have that. Possibly they require a solid
    background in control theory. Your five years in the game sound good but
    if in doubt, ask them.

    Never seen a photo of Ray with such a short haircut. And he got older
    .... <looking into mirror> ... Oh!
     
  3. Ray Ridley would be a great hands on teacher.
    Hey Joerg, IMHO you need this workshop!
    Harry
     
  4. Joerg

    Joerg Guest


    I like the "design and build" parts in that seminar, especially about
    transformers. Nothing lets you appreciate magnetics as much as when you
    have built the first one with your own hands.


    Did I screw up somewhere? Or is it because of a really good brewsky they
    have in Atlanta?
     
  5. miso

    miso Guest

    If you are using off the shelf controllers, I'm not so sure this
    workshop is really needed. If you are rolling your own switchers, well
    you shouldn't be.
     
  6. panfilero

    panfilero Guest

    Thanks for the advice, it sounds really good, one concern I have is that it's tied too much to their design software they sell, I'd hate to spend 4 days learning how to use a software package to design magnetics or power supplies, I really do like the hands on aspect of it
     
  7. RobertMacy

    RobertMacy Guest


    Check out LTspice. It's free, educational, and has lots of support people.
     
  8. Joerg

    Joerg Guest


    Off-the-shelf controllers teach you nothing about the magnetics,
    intracacies of capacitors, things like that. Heck, they don't even tell
    you how an LC post-filter somewhere down the line can cause the whole
    chebang to go berserk. If someone isn't very familiar with all that
    (usually via blood, sweat and tears) such a workshop can be very worthwhile.

    Almost anyone who has ever designed under super-tight budget for
    consumer gear will know otherwise. One of my early cases was when a new
    client had a working design but Maxim could not furnish production
    quantities of their MAX770. No surprise there. Since there wasn't any
    competing part with similar performance and price I ripped it all out,
    designed my own discrete solution, with current mode control and all,
    and that is still in production.
     
  9. miso

    miso Guest

    Uh, because eval boards are designed to provide good working circuits.
    Yes, a novel idea.

    You do realize a chip all by its lonesome is way more reliable than
    something that uses firmware to run.
     
  10. miso

    miso Guest

    Funny how these cellphone manufacturers manage to source controller
    chips. Well I guess some people know how to run a business.
     
  11. miso

    miso Guest

    LTSpice is brilliant marketing and engineering. The spice works well,
    the schematic capture is on par with most pro software, and it seems to
    be just a tad bit easier to use LT parts than the competition. But LT
    makes good stuff, so that by itself isn't a drawback.
     
  12. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    If you can make a product by simply copying more or less from an eval
    board you might as well outsource the whole "design". It's cheaper that
    way. The rubber really meets the road when the client or your marketing
    folks tell you that they want it in a tube the size of this here
    ballpoint pen.


    Unless the company making the chip can't deliver quantities in time.
    Then the firmware solution, the discrete solution, or pretty much any
    other solution is a better solution. Because it avoids the single-source
    problem.
     
  13. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Some vendors don't know that, as has been evidenced numerous times. If a
    manufacturer cannot keep distributors properly stocked then it is not a
    good manufacturer. It is that simple.
     
  14. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    Yup. And somtimes one just has to live with those, like it can be with
    idling combustion engines.
    Exactamente. Although I only used one CD40106. More gusto to drive the
    FET gate, via a pnp/npn follower. I got about the same efficiency at
    much lower cost and most of all we got rid of this unreliable
    single-source situation.
     
  15. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    And the winner is ... LTC. As expected.

    Mistake. Big mistake. Just like WebBench is to me.

    Well, yeah, but they are very fast and can quickly show you if an
    unorthodox idea works. Only once (in many years) did I have a
    discrepancy between a model and real life that almost became a
    showstopper. It was a chip designer error on the LT6700 series, to which
    LTC immediately fessed up and issued corrective action.

    One of my recent jobs, a set of four switchers operating in a very slow
    external non-linear loop, would have taken many hours per run if I had
    used real IC models instead of proprietary behavioral.
     
  16. Joerg

    Joerg Guest

    That's ok but if they think that way then the company should be honest
    about it and clearly say so. What I find dishonest is to wet someone's
    appetite with ads, demo parts and whatnot, have them design it in, and
    then not delivering product in due course.
     
  17. Joerg

    Joerg Guest


    Why not just ask Ray about that?
     
  18. Guest

    I don't know where you live but this one is free.

    http://www.arrownac.com/offers/vision-2013/
     
  19. miso

    miso Guest

    You remind me of some old lady that got cheated by some name your ethnic
    minority and thus has concluded for the rest of eternity that said
    ethnic minority is a bunch of crooks. [Those damn Martians screwed me. I
    will never buy from extra-terrestrials again!]

    OK, Maxim dissed your dinky company. Get over it. Years ago they screwed
    lots of people, but the people responsible for such nonsense are gone.
    [Still plenty more people need to be shown the door, but plenty of
    wankers retired.] Buy from LTC, TI, whatever.
     
  20. miso

    miso Guest

    Depends. If a uP adds protections that an analog chip doesn't, then
    Clearly you don't understand how watchdogs work.
     
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