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Operational Amplifiers

Discussion in 'Electronics Homework Help' started by vasimavr, Sep 4, 2014.

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  1. vasimavr

    vasimavr

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    Sep 4, 2014
    Hi I am Vasimavr and I was wondering if you could help me do my homework.

    For the circuit of the picture, calculate the output V0.

    R1 = 10 Kohm
    R2 = 10 Kohm
    R3 = 20 Kohm
    R4 = 10 Kohm
    R5 = 50 Kohm

    V1 = 4V
    V2 = 3V
    V3 = 6V

    Thanks for your help!
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 4, 2014
  2. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
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    Dec 18, 2013
    You missed something from your post.
    "Hi I am Vasimavr and I was wondering if you could help me do my homework"
    " Thanks for your help"
    "Vasimavr"
     
  3. vasimavr

    vasimavr

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    Sep 4, 2014
    You have right sorryyy ;)
     
  4. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
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    Dec 18, 2013
    We can help but we won't do it for you. Tell us what you understand and what have you tried. Do this for all your posts.
    Adam
     
  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,672
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    Sep 5, 2009
    Hi Vasimavr

    as I have said in your 2 other posts ......

    the people here wont give you the outright answers, but will help you work your way through the problem
    Ok, so you must have been studying this subject in class
    What have you learnt so far about biasing transistors in general ?
    what formula do you think are appropriate to help you solve this question ?


    cheers
    Dave
     
  6. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

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    Nov 28, 2011
    There's a problem with that question. Look at V3. It's connected to the summing node at the inverting input of the first op-amp. The non-inverting input is connected to 0V. If that op-amp was operating (pun intended) normally, the inverting input would also be at 0V. But the question specifies that V3 is +6V. If +6V is fed into that point, that will cause that op-amp's output to swing hard to positive, and the voltage won't be defined, because the power supply rails and the op-amp type aren't specified.

    That would probably cause the second op-amp to do the same thing. So the circuit's output would be some undefined positive voltage somewhat less than the positive supply rail.

    Perhaps that diagram is for a different question?
     
  7. vasimavr

    vasimavr

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    0
    Sep 4, 2014
    Thanks for reply. It is the correct exercise diagram... I have solve a same exercise but in this case i cannot take correct results...
     

    Attached Files:

  8. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

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    Nov 28, 2011
    The schematic in post #7 is different from the one at the start of this thread.

    If you exchange all of the inputs on your schematic in post #7 (you have them reversed), then it's probably easy enough to solve it. (I haven't tried.) But the schematic in post #1 is different. It has a voltage, V3, connected directly to the summing node of the first op-amp. This is not valid.
     
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