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One Hour Appliance Timer--Where Finde?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by W. Watson, Feb 6, 2004.

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  1. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    Where can I get an appliance timer that I can just set to some time between 0 minutes
    and 60 minutes to turn on a 1500 watt heater, and then turn it off? I'd like not to
    have to wire it into the AC circuit. It should be like a typical 24 hour appliance timer.
    --
    Wayne T. Watson (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N, 2,701 feet, Nevada City, CA)
    -- GMT-8 hr std. time, RJ Rcvr 39° 8' 0" N, 121° 1' 0" W

    "Birds take off at sunrise. On the opposite side of the world, they are
    landing at sunset. This causes the earth to spin on its axis." -- Unknown

    Web Page: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews>
    sierra_mtnview -at- earthlink -dot- net
    Imaginarium Museum: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews/imaginarium.html>
     
  2. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    an appliance timer...time between 0 minutes and 60 minutes
    http://www.grainger.com/
    You will likely also have to get
    a junction box, outlet, and line cord / plug
    and wire it up as a stand-alone unit.

    BTW, make sure that this 1500W load
    is the only thing on the circuit (breaker).
     
  3. W. Watson

    W. Watson Guest

    Sounds like a good solution. Why the only thing? I would think most circuits could
    handle a few thousand watts. Is it something about the timer box itself?

    --
    Wayne T. Watson (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N, 2,701 feet, Nevada City, CA)
    -- GMT-8 hr std. time, RJ Rcvr 39° 8' 0" N, 121° 1' 0" W

    "Birds take off at sunrise. On the opposite side of the world, they are
    landing at sunset. This causes the earth to spin on its axis." -- Unknown

    Web Page: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews>
    sierra_mtnview -at- earthlink -dot- net
    Imaginarium Museum: <home.earthlink.net/~mtnviews/imaginarium.html>
     
  4. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    BTW, make sure that this 1500W load
    Making certain assumptions and erring on the safe side.
    I'm thinking 15A residential breakers and inrush current.
    1500W / 120V = 12.5A continuous ( + cold element surge)
     
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