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Old XRSUPER6 Security System Programming

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by m4gnum99, Jan 2, 2020.

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  1. m4gnum99

    m4gnum99

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    Jan 2, 2020
    Hey guys,



    not sure if this is the right area to post...but we've inherited a functioning security system in a home where some remodeling was done and some zones were eliminated. it seems asinine to ask but since the unit is so old, going through the menus is a pain. for anyone with alarm programming knowledge, is it possible to go through the menu to delete a zone permanently so that I can arm the system? it's looking for zones that don't exist anymore.
     
  2. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
  3. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    2,647
    717
    May 12, 2015
  4. m4gnum99

    m4gnum99

    4
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    Jan 2, 2020
    Thanks guys. It’s not quite discerning as to how to reprogram a zone moreso than just skipping a zone. I am still able to forcibly bypass the zones but it’s still reading faults because obviously I removed some zones with the remodel. Anyone familiar with these old style security systems? Is it a wiring thing or can I make the unit forget these old zones. Instructions unclear.
     
  5. ChosunOne

    ChosunOne

    351
    88
    Jun 20, 2010
    For future reference, it's best to give make and model of your Control Panel (not the Keypad) when posting questions, Kudos for naming the model, XRSuper6; the Maker is DMP. If you search "DMP XRSuper6", it's more effective than just "XRSuper6".

    The bad news is that DMP is one of those proprietary brands that are not DIY-friendly; in fact, they're downright hostile to DIYers in re programming. You will not be able to make the Control Panel "forget" any of the zones without an expensive service call from the installing dealer.
    The good news is that IF your missing zones are among the 10 on-board zones (zones 1 thru 10) landed (connected) on the Control Panel (CP) terminal strip along the bottom of the PCB, then the hardware is pretty much universal and an easy fix.

    Link to installer manual:
    https://buy.dmp.com/dmp/products/documents/LT-0624.pdf
    Look at the wiring diagram to see to which terminals on the bottom of PCB your missing zones are connected. This is still assuming the zones in question are numbered 1 thru 10. Note that zones 1 thru 9 share a common ground, but Zone 10 had two dedicated polarized terminals. I'm not going to explain this unless you ask or tell me Z10 is one of the problem zones. There's usually no preference as to polarity on the zone loop for zones 1 thru 9, but the GND is negative.
    EDIT: Rating of the 1K Resistors can be 1/8 W or even less. Those zone loops are current-limited to a few miliamps at most. There's no upper Watt rating if you have larger resistors handy.

    For future reference, when you have problems zones, it's best to NAME WHICH ZONE(S): Not all zones are the same. Also it wouldn't hurt to mention if the zones are doors, windows, or motion or glassbreak sensors, etc; so that I know if we need to worry about a 12VDC power wire that may have been severed during remodeling. I've seen unused-but-live power wires sit in walls for years before one day shorting out and causing problems.

    Still assuming that we're working with zones numbered between 1 and 9: Determine where the problem zones are connected, and disconnect said zone loop wires. Note that other zones may share a common GND terminal, so be sure not to disconnect the GND wire from a working zone. You should be able to follow the (+) wire to find its matcihing GND/(-) side in the Control Panel cabinet.
    If you're lucky, the installer put the EOLRs (End-of-Line Resistors) in the cabinet (box) so you have them handy. If not, you'll need to buy a 1K-Ohm resistor to bridge between each zone and GND. This makes your control panel happy that the zone is properly "Normal", and you'll be able to Arm/Disarm without going through the Bypass Procedure each Arming period.


    Your CP is capable of handling a lot more than 10 zones, using zone expansion modules. If one or more of your problem zones is numbered higher than 10, then let me know and I'll do the homework needed to see if you can do anything about it. More than ten zones would imply that you have one or more extra zone expansion modules at/near the CP, and I'd need (a) model number(s) for it(them).


    For future consideration, if you ever need to replace your CP: I strongly recommend you buy a DIY-friendly make and model, e.g. a Honeywell / Ademco Vista-20P, that lets you (the User) stay in control of your system without being dependent on a dealer for programming.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2020
    m4gnum99 likes this.
  6. m4gnum99

    m4gnum99

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    Jan 2, 2020

    Hey ChosunOne, just happened to catch my phones notification of the post. I want to just say a quick thanks! I’m going to carefully go through this reply and hopefully solve the issue. Lol. And my apologies. I didn’t know if my post would get any traction so I was a bit lazy with my wording. I did know it was DMP. and I had a feeling it was going to be a pain because I actually tried calling them and they wouldn’t help me unless I could confirm I was one of their “business clients”. I actually did some googling and found DMP basically markets this to the “John Smith” XYZ security company and even brags how they could emboss their company’s logo on the little space on the panel designed for this purpose. I am most worried like you said about a live wire still possibly walled over and could cause issues or shortages in the future. Everything in this home was done half-ass. Lol.
     
  7. m4gnum99

    m4gnum99

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    Jan 2, 2020
    And on a random side note, if the home wasn’t previously wired I would ditch the whole thing and just go for one of these new dangled Ring, or whatever systems. They really are killing the big security companies with way cheaper pricing. I just like mine because I have two hardwired sirens that would go off and alert my whole block which is way better than active monitoring and paying a ton of money. My nosy neighbors would have the police here faster than ADT (or similar) hahahah
     
  8. ChosunOne

    ChosunOne

    351
    88
    Jun 20, 2010
    Yeah, the hardwired really loud sirens of professional-grade systems is a definite advantage over the popular DIY table-top control models.

    From my own standpoint, I'm old-school and prefer hard-wiring zones when I can do it. I really like how reliable wireless sensor/transmitters have become in the last few decades, and they're a blessing when I just can't get a wire where I want it without major surgery or running exposed wire; but almost all homes lend themselves to at least some hardwired zones. Besides being more reliable than wireless, hardwired devices are universally compatible with any make and model panel that supports hardwired zones; which is all professional-grade panels, regardless of make & model. Mostly I favor HW because the wiring never becomes obsolete. When I hardwire zones, I've created permanent value in the system: If you decide to upgrade your CP, now or in 20 years, your hardwired zones will be compatible with any professional-grade CP. The same may not be true of wireless sensor/transmitter units and their RF Receiver that interface them into the system. Almost all RF (wireless) devices are brand-specific, and subject to eventual obsolescence.

    I haven't had occasion to take a close look at any of the popular DIY mass-marketed systems, but IINM, none of them support any hardwired zones. Also, the alarm industry had a similar surge of hardware-store DIY wireless-only system competition back in the '80s, that left their customers high and dry a few years later when the RF equipment because obsolete: The manufacturers stopped supporting "older" equipment (a few years old), and Users found they couldn't replace damaged/missing equipment, nor add any new zones. If they wanted to keep their homes covered, they had to buy all new systems, including the sensors on all the windows and doors. Door/window sensors aren't that expensive, but all the openings in a house add up: Typically the sensors in an all-wireless system cost more than the CP, keypads, and siren(s) combined.

    With professional-grade systems, there is a community of service techs who talk to each other, and we more-or-less know what brands & models are reliable, and what works and what doesn't, each model's quirks, how well each brand is supported, etc. With DIY stuff, it can be hard to assess what brands and models to rely on. I'm retired now and I may just some day run across someone with a Ring security or one of the other brands, that wants a hand, and then I'll be able to asses it better.

    Those systems are still relatively new. For now, I'm waiting to see how well the manufactures support equipment that was sold a few years ago. Unlike in the '80s, I have the Internet to help me keep posted now.
     
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