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Old School and stuck on component ID

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by Dave Jackson, May 5, 2016.

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  1. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson

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    May 5, 2016
    Hi all. As the title suggests I am pretty old school and am struggling to ID many of the surface mount components used today. I am trying to ID the part in the picture with 201 stamped on top. It is wired in parallel to the LED (which I think is 1 watt as it draws 400ma @ 2.4 volts)

    I am working on an LED light fixture made up of 135 LED's made up of three banks of 45 LED's wired in series and supplied by a 100-140v LED driver for each bank of 45 LED's. Each LED is paralleed with this 201 component. I have two dead LED"s and one also has this component (201) which has fried and broken apart.

    Could someone please assist me to ID this part and a suitable replacement for it?

    LED and component.JPG
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2016
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,721
    1,913
    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there
    welcome to EP :)

    the 201 is a 200 Ohm surface mount resistor :)

    for your info ... the 3 digit scheme works as this .... first 2 digits are values
    and the 3rd digit is the number of following zeros for a total Ohms, so 20 and 1 zero = 200 Ohms

    203 = 20 + 3 zeros = 20000 Ohms = 20 kΩ
    154 = 15 + 4 zeros = 150000 Ohms = 150 kΩ


    Dave
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2016
  3. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson

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    May 5, 2016
    Hi Dave and thank you!
    D'oh, a resistor eh I was thinking a diode or zener by the package, just goes to show I should trust my test gear which said 198 ohm lol

    Is there a resource where I can look up these things? I found one site that said it was a zener but the picture showed a 3 leg device so was wrong.

    Thanks again!
    Dave
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,721
    1,913
    Sep 5, 2009
    just google surface mount (SMD) resistors, you will likely get 100's of links to useful info :)


    cheers
    Dave
     
  5. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
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    Jun 20, 2015
    Old school?
    Look at it as the same numerical, no-color code for 3 and 4 digit codes.
    There are some more codes , here is a nice site including a calculator and video.
    Another issue is the SMD resistors sizes/wattage.

    In general ,for ceramic caps SMD is a head-hack,the parts are not marked!!!
    For SMD transistors etc. it is a jungle...a machete will not always help to clear:(
     
  6. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson

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    May 5, 2016
    Old school in the respect my electronics experiance was from hobbying in my teens, am mid 50s now and getting back to it as a hobby after a career as an electrician specilizing in high end commercial appliances. Since the advent of SMD's the physical look of the components has changed a lot and many types seem to look much the same, not to mention being able to see them at my age lol. Getting back into it seems to be a bit of a welcome to the jungle situation!
    I guess we are not meant to repair anything anyway these days but I just can't help myself and have to try :)
    Thanks for the link and help!
    Cheers
    Dave
     
  7. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    400ma per LED? That's with or without current limiting?

    Over 100watts of light? So each led has a 200ohm smd resistor? Which brings the current right down no where near 400ma

    I'm confused by the setup
     
  8. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

    1,096
    104
    Oct 26, 2011
    Maybe the fact it use 1watt leds and not something lower rated got me confused
     
  9. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson

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    May 5, 2016
    To be honest I am a bit confused by the setup myself and suspect there is some poor design in the fixture, it claims 300 watt total from 135 leds which doesn't match up with any wattage LED I can find on the market. I have read that a 3 watt led will replace a 1 watt one and figuring the total wattage suggests 1.5 watt that doesn't seem to exist I am hedging my bets and going with a 3 w replacment. Its also weird that it has two drivers for each bank in parallel... a truely weird design... it even has six cooling fans... interestingly the LEDs that failed are down the centreline between the fans so maybe there is a hot spot and they overheated. With all the leds in series and each having a paralleled 200 ohm resistor that looks to be about half watt, when the diode died its tried to draw all the load of the other leds through the smd resistor for the dead led, the resistor didn't stand a chance.
     
  10. Herschel Peeler

    Herschel Peeler

    401
    65
    Feb 21, 2016
    A part number off the LED might be helpful in determining a replacement.
     
  11. Dave Jackson

    Dave Jackson

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    May 5, 2016
    Hi
    Unfortuneately the diode is completely blank with no ID what so ever, the only mark on it is the stamp to show the anode.
    Cheers
    Dave
     
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