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Old Popular Science...

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Lord Garth, Dec 11, 2004.

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  1. Lord Garth

    Lord Garth Guest

    Does anybody recall a Popular Science write up on modification of an AM
    radio
    to receive aircraft weather? The time frame would be 1972 to 1974 IIRC.

    The mod was to solder two caps across the loop stick antenna points to cause
    the radio to tune a band below the AM broadcast band. The value of the caps
    depended upon which region in the US you were located. Thanks!

    LG
     
  2. I remember an article around that time frame (maybe a couple years later
    though) involving converting a radio shack weather radio to receive the
    aircraft band. I don't remember the exact details, but the FM to AM
    conversion was interesting as I recall.
     
  3. Dave Holford

    Dave Holford Guest

    I think I remember something like that. But, I don't believe that there are
    any remaining voice weather transmissions on the beacon band - just slow
    speed CW idents and DGPS data.

    Dave
     
  4. Lord Garth

    Lord Garth Guest

    I used to retune their weather radios to listen to the police frequencies
    in my home town then. I was at my parents home when the grain
    elevator blew around christmas time. The radio was handy to hear
    what had blown and what was happening during the aftermath.
     
  5. Lord Garth

    Lord Garth Guest

    I was wondering if that was the case or whether they simply repeated the
    NOAA
    VHF broadcasts. The beacon band transmissions formally gave wind speed and
    direction at various altitudes which NOAA never did.

    Thanks
     
  6. The loopstick isn't the only thing you have to pad with a cap. You also
    have to pad the local oscillator with a cap. and it has to be the
    appropriate value so that the LO tracks when you tune the radio across
    the 'band'.

    But I'm not so sure those old weather transmitters are still around. At
    least not in the band below the AM BCB. I think the weather is on
    162.55 MHz or thereabouts.
     
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