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Old Capacitor Codes?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Grant Stockly, Apr 26, 2007.

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  1. I have second hand word that a specific capacitor is a Z5U 1000M 1KV.
    This doesn't follow the standard 3 digit capacitor code. Is it
    possible back in the 70s that 100pf could be written as 1000M instead
    of 101M?

    Grant
     
  2. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Z5U is the dielectric.

    M is the tolerance code - 20% IIRC.

    It looks like 1000 pF to me.

    Graham
     
  3. Tom Biasi

    Tom Biasi Guest

    You have a 1000pF 1000Volt cap.

    "In the 70s" 1000pF would have been 1000MMF.

    M meaning micro (10^-6)

    I bet some guys here called them Mickey Mikes.

    Tom
     

  4. "Picklefarts" was used a lot more than "Mickey Mikes".


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  5. Radiosrfun

    Radiosrfun Guest

    Been a long time since having heard the term - Mickey Mikes, but can't
    recall ever hearing "Picklefarts". I "may" have - just can't recall it at
    moment.
     

  6. It might have been a regional thing. It was a common term around the
    shops I worked at as a kid.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  7. Actually, by the 70's it was pretty much over.

    IN the early sixties, about 1963, some standards organization cleared
    out some of the rot, so there was a more consistent useage. It
    was the same thing that brought in the term "Hertz" rather than
    the previous "cycles per second".

    And that's when pF came along, to replace the somewhat odd "mmf" or
    "uuF".

    By the seventies, the only reason you'd see "mmF" is because parts
    still in use were marked that way, and the relative oldtimers hadn't
    switched over. It was no longer showing up in the magazines.

    Michael
     
  8. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  9. But my point was that "uuF"/"mmF" was no longer used by the seventies.

    Michael
     
  10. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  11. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Or 1000 uuF

    But only in the USA.

    Graham
     
  12. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Over here we call them puffs or puff.

    Graham
     
  13. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Only true of the USA.

    I was using nF well before that time.

    Graham
     
  14. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    But you Americans drag your feet over everything.

    I was using nF in the late 60s. My Philips "Transistor Audio and Radio Circuits"
    handbook has nF and it was printed in 1969.

    Graham
     
  15. Radiosrfun

    Radiosrfun Guest

    Around "here" - I heard them referred to that as well.
     

  16. I believe you, but I've never met a puff in the USA.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     

  17. nF was in use in the early '60s, but it went away.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  18. Lionel

    Lionel Guest

    Over here, we used to call them "puffs".
    As in: "Anyone got a 100 puff cap in their kit?"
     
  19. Lionel

    Lionel Guest

    Ditto. "nF" was in common use in Oz at least as early as the mid 70s.
     
  20. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    So were we.

    The point I was making, which you seemed to have missed, is that
    Michael Black's comment that: "Actually, by the 70's it was pretty
    much over." was untrue since the old notations lingered for a long
    time.
     
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