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Old analog meters

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Mark D. Zacharias, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. Started collecting them pretty recently - Weston, Eico, Precision Apparatus,
    etc. Even a Japanese JRC vom from about 1950.

    Wondering what cool old meters you guys have at work or at home?

    Care to share thoughts / reminiscences?


    Mark Z.
     
  2. Cees Keyer

    Cees Keyer Guest

    I am still using an AVO 7 in leather carrying case and an AVO 25
    multimeter.
     
  3. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest


    Have you ever tried repairing one ?
    Or even ,for the experience, removing the movement and replacing it without
    spring/seating/ bias problem ?
    Once you master that then coil winding must be a sinch
     
  4. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest


    Here's an oddity, 5 inches across in a 10x10x10 inch case
    http://home.graffiti.net/diverse:graffiti.net/analogue_meter.jpg
    Don't know what make, says Model 32 , surprisingly in a wooden not bakelite
    case and porcelain terminal insulators, as it says "Tropical" on the legend.
    I used to use it along with a couple of circa Gohm glass encapsulated
    resistors for measuring EHT, now use a purpose made EHT 100:1 divider
     
  5. Arfa Daily

    Arfa Daily Guest

    AVO 8 Mk IV. Never did like the ones that they scaled in 3s and 10s. The
    Mk IV is 2.5s and 10s. It was issued to me on my first day as an apprentice
    on my very first day of work out of school nearly forty years ago, all
    fresh-faced and ready to take on the world ...

    Both me and the meter look a bit longer in the tooth, and battered around
    the edges now, but we both still work, just about ! d;~}

    Arfa
     
  6. Yeah, sometimes the scales are a bit disappointing for the type of stuff we
    use these things for. I mean a 300 volt scale to measure 120 AC gives a
    less-than satisfactory indication, as does 12 volts DC on a 50 volt scale.
    Still usable of course, but accuracy may suffer a bit.

    These days it seems there is less and less actual troubleshooting with
    meters and 'scopes, though. We have a Sony guru who only grabs the DMM maybe
    once every month or two. Any more it's mostly boards, lamps, fans, panels,
    etc.

    I might keep an eye out for a Mark IV...I think I've seen them on eBay a
    time or two.


    Mark Z.
     
  7. Yep, What modern general purpose DMM has a 5 kV range?! :)

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  8. What modern general-purpose DMM has a 5 kV range?! :)

    What modern general-purpose DMM has room for such a big range resistor?
     
  9. Well, I do have an RCA WV-38A with 5 kV ranges, but I virtually never need
    any of that. About the highest I ever go on a regular basis is the 200 volt
    line on a CRT set or the Vs voltage in a plasma.

    I might just pick up a Simpson of some variety or other though. The 260 XLPM
    looks pretty good - I like the extra ranges compared to a regular 260 and I
    must confess that between my advancing old age and laziness from using a DMM
    the past 20 years, simple precautions I learned in tech school need to be
    relearned. The other day I inadvertently put my Fluke 8800A probes across a
    50 volt DC source while on a 200 ohm resistance setting. Didn't seem to
    damage it, but boy, I sure gotta watch that stuff. Hopefully the relay
    protection on the Simpson would prevent damage from any such stupidity.

    Mark Z.
     
  10. I have a Fluke 85 series III and like it a lot - it's my "standard" to
    compare others to.

    Mark Z.
     
  11. My problem with the 8P and some other later Simpsons is those stupid
    inverted banana plug inputs. I need to be able to use conventional banana
    types.

    Mark Z.
     
  12. Extra low? Never had a standard banana type arc or cause a problem this way,
    and used them up to at least several hundred volts. The Simpsons used them
    from the 3 series until the 7 series, IIRC.

    Mark Z.
     
  13. Arfa Daily

    Arfa Daily Guest

    Website specs would suggest that fully insulated ones are good to 3.5kV RMS
    minimum. I have a pair on the end of a cable feeding HT of around 2kV to a
    144MHz tube based linear, and they have never given me any problems.

    Arfa
     
  14. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    :Started collecting them pretty recently - Weston, Eico, Precision Apparatus,
    :etc. Even a Japanese JRC vom from about 1950.
    :
    :Wondering what cool old meters you guys have at work or at home?
    :
    :Care to share thoughts / reminiscences?
    :
    :
    :Mark Z.
    :


    If you check out the list of manufacturers here http://www.radiomuseum.org/ you
    can get some good info and pictures on old analog meters among other stuff.

    I managed to pick up a 60's era Unigor 3 made by Goerz (Austria) on Ebay and
    this has a 5kV input range on it.
     

  15. I don't really see them being any safer. Regular bananas have been safely
    used for decades plus. I don't doubt that somewhere along the line somebody
    probably sued somebody and this is why we now have those ridiculous inverted
    bananas, but I won't accept them for normal applications.


    Mark Z.
     
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