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Non-changing current with C-EMF

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by XRZ, Jul 30, 2014.

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  1. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    If you account for the resistance in the power source, the actual current induced by the EMF is far lower than we are writing down. This would drastically reduce the power consumption you are concerned with.
     
  2. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Jul 30, 2014
    @Gryd3, could you use an example(need numbers to visualize!).
     
  3. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Jul 30, 2014
    Btw, what do all think of my suggestion to use a dc/dc converter? With a 300W input power to sustain 100A @3VDC? Does it make any sense?Could it work?

    @Arouse1973 , @Gryd3
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2014
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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  5. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Making the issue of power negligible! Dropping the 10,000W required input significantly!
    No need for 100V x 100A I guess :D!
    Okay, it seems that it is indeed possible to solve such a problem, and not exhaust enormous power. I just wanted a solution where I can add more voltage to a system, without adding x100 or x1000 times of power. Like the example I proposed, where back-emf induced is 2V and the source voltage has to be 3V to maintain 100A, that should require a power source of 300W, but due to the resistance of the circuit the ideal input would be 100A @ 100VDC, but that's a lot more than what we need! So it does make sense to use other methods to reduce power.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2014
  6. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    I think we're all on the same page... know there was something simple we were missing.

    Thanks @Arouse1973 for filling the blank spot in my head!
     
  7. XRZ

    XRZ

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    But, if you think about it a bit.. how much power do we actually need a factor of what :p?
    How can we calculate the power that's going to be exhausted additionally to maintain the same current when back-emf is induced by a magnetic field?
     
  8. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    I think that would be way over my head. You would need to factor in the rate of change, and figure out what the equivalent resistance is of the circuit including the power supply to determine how much of a difference would actually be made.
     
  9. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Ok XRZ lets have a go. You need gives us some info. We need to know the size and length of the wire and current in the wire. We need to know what the EMF source is. Inductance, frequency, and voltage. Make it up if you have to but be reasonable. If not I can assume a few things. I cant do it right now as I am on my Tablet.
    Adam.
     
  10. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Okay, consider it to be a copper square that is 20 cm wide, 0.4cm thick, 20 cm long. Its resistance is about 4.2x10^-5 Ω, inductance : 56 nH , magnetic field is a 0.5T uniform field from an electromagnet.
    Voltage should be: 0.0000042Ω x 1000A = 0.0042VoltsDC. Imagine the magnetic field changing contniously(however you would like to imagine it going on/off or rotating next to conductor). However, the change is massive. delta(BA)/delta(t) = 0.5Tx0.4m^2/0.100s = -2VDC induced back-emf.

    What is the factor of power jump here? From 0.0042VDC x 1000A = 4.2W to what...?

    I hope this is a reasonable example, if you need to please adjust it! for frequency I dont know why it's needed since it's a DC circuit?
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2014
  11. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Thats quite precise lol is this a question from a book?
    Adam
     
  12. XRZ

    XRZ

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    The intuitive power required to do this: (2.0042VDC)^2/(0.0000042Ω) = 956385W, That's 227710 times greater than the original input.
     
  13. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Jul 30, 2014
  14. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Yeah right.
     
  15. XRZ

    XRZ

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    @Arouse1973 I really did... I've had this idea in my mind for a while now so...
     
  16. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Ok whats the project or is it secret?
     
  17. XRZ

    XRZ

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    Its not a project at all...an experiment to prove the possibility of maintaining the same current on a conductor, without exhausting enormous power.
    I self-teach myself electronics and tropics in electrical engineering on my own free time(oh and Physics!), and really tend to think of abstract experiments! :cool:
    Which teaches me a lot of things, and sometimes conceptualize more.
     
  18. XRZ

    XRZ

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    @Arouse1973 it seems that I caught your interest? :rolleyes:
    Btw, is what I'm proposing common... or I'm asking something weird...? Because I don't think this is a typical question/problem.
     
  19. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Thats good I am the same. I am not academic so my brain is free to think way outside the box at times. I love Physics also and how odd it can be at times
    Adam
     
    XRZ likes this.
  20. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Its not common but interesting none the less.
    Adam
     
    XRZ likes this.
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