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Noisy Cpu Fan

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Holl, Nov 29, 2003.

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  1. Holl

    Holl Guest

    Hi,

    I have a 4 year old pc a (433mhz intel celeron) which has developed a
    annoying fault the cpu fan has become more noisy than usual it was never
    that quiet to begin with as its a cheap entry level pc any way on start up
    sounds like the fan is going in to overdrive then after a while it will
    settle down to normal noise levels but then completely at random the fan
    will speed up then slow down speed up slow down ect..... this go on 4 a
    while sometimes ten mins or an hour then the fan will drop back to normal
    noise levels for a while then after a bit the cycle will continue.

    any ideas just a fan that wearing out ? or something that's more involved im
    not a tech so if it a serious fault will have to get someone in but I don't
    want to spend loads of cash on a pc that's fast becoming obsolete.

    any replies appreciated.

    Thx,

    Holl.






    Remove NOSPAM to rely
     
  2. dried out bearings?? see if there is a foil seal over the motor housing or
    an oil hole in it and drop a bit of light weight lube into the bugger. If
    you can get the entire unit out of the PC, open it up and spray in some WD40
    until the gunk drips out then let it dry out before putting it back in.

    K
     
  3. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    Over the years, I have had to change a fan from time to time. The are not
    expensive. Most of the time, I had to resplice the wires to the connector.
    If it is the CPU fan, these are very standard for their fit and connector.
    Rather than take the chance of total failure, and loosing the computer, I
    change a fan at the first sign that it will fail. The most common failure
    are the bearings. Once they start to make noise, they will eventually
    seize, and then the big problems will start.

    As for a power supply fan, the mechanical fit and voltages are standard. To
    change the fan, you must first check the voltage specs, and size. Once
    these are matched, you get a fan that matches. The only thing I've had to do
    with these is splice in the original connector. In any case with these DC
    fans, the polarity is critical. If you cross the polarity, you can damage
    the fan.

    As for lubricating them, it is possible using some light machine oil,
    providing you have access to the front and rear bearings. I would rather
    change the fan than take the chance of lubricating it to avoid a noise that
    is really due to possibly warn bearings. It is not worth to risk loosing a
    computer over being chinsy to replace a low cost fan.

    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    =========================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    =========================================


    Hi,

    I have a 4 year old pc a (433mhz intel celeron) which has developed a
    annoying fault the cpu fan has become more noisy than usual it was never
    that quiet to begin with as its a cheap entry level pc any way on start up
    sounds like the fan is going in to overdrive then after a while it will
    settle down to normal noise levels but then completely at random the fan
    will speed up then slow down speed up slow down ect..... this go on 4 a
    while sometimes ten mins or an hour then the fan will drop back to normal
    noise levels for a while then after a bit the cycle will continue.

    any ideas just a fan that wearing out ? or something that's more involved im
    not a tech so if it a serious fault will have to get someone in but I don't
    want to spend loads of cash on a pc that's fast becoming obsolete.

    any replies appreciated.

    Thx,

    Holl.






    Remove NOSPAM to rely
     
  4. I have found that WD40 is only a temp fix to help wash out the goop. For a
    longer fix, a light oil must be used.

    WT
     
  5. If you use WD40, you'll probably be doing the same repair very soon. WD40
    is NOT a long term lubricant!!!!

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    contact me, please use the Feedback Form at repairfaq.org. Thanks.
     
  6. Thomas Abell

    Thomas Abell Guest

    I have had success using molylube. It quiets them down nicely and lasts.
     
  7. Swells8044

    Swells8044 Guest

    I would replace the fan.Heck you can buy a new heatsink fan combo for under
    $20.00 anywhere.
    Steve
     
  8. Holl

    Holl Guest



    Thanks to all who replied I tried the light oil fix and now all is back to
    normal :) will see how it goes didn't realise fans were so cheap have seen
    some online for as little as £4.00 today

    Holl.
     
  9. CJT

    CJT Guest

    All fans are not created equal. You should replace with one that moves
    at least as much air as the original.
     
  10. Over the years I have found that the fans used on processors are almost
    invariably cheap rubbish. Almost every fan I've ever had got noisy and often
    stopped or slowed down, overheating the processor. The problems result from
    the fact that few fans have proper bearings - such as ball bearings, and use
    bushings which tend to dry out and seize. Lubricating them often causes a
    buildup of goo in the bushing, causing it to seize again.. As you have
    found, these fans are cheap and easy to replace (with a lot of care). I
    would look out for a higher quality fan, such as one with ball bearings
    instead of a bushing, although in some cases I've had doubts whether fans
    advertised as having ball bearings actually do have them.

    For the Pentium 4 processors there are upmarket fan/heat sink combinations
    which - for a price - run quiet, are more reliable and are selectable multi
    speed.
     
  11. And, VERY IMPORTANT - if the noise suddenly STOPS, check the fan that it's
    running. It may have seized completely and will cook your processor in a
    very short time.
     
  12. REPLACE IT. My CPU fan started making noise one night a few weeks ago.
    I opened the case to see it moving erratically and stopping once in a
    while.

    You can spend $8 for a fan now, or $80 for a new processor soon.
     
  13. Sunny

    Sunny Guest

    I would agree, except my experience has been that a cleaned and
    lubricated original fan tends to last considerably longer than a new
    replacement fan.

    Computer processors rarely fail as a result of fan failure - the
    heatsink alone typically provides sufficient heat transfer to avoid
    permanent processor damage. Frequent system crashes are the more usual
    symptom.

    I'm a firm believer in preventative maintenance. I clean out the dust
    and check that all fans are spinning freely at least annually. Using
    fans with RPM sensors combined with software which warns you if a fan
    has slowed or stopped is also highly recommended.
     
  14. Guest

    About the same cost as a used 433 Celeron, right?

    -Chris
     
  15. Guest

    WD40 is nothing but kerosene and it evaporates.
    Use silicone spray. Comes in cans just like WD40 and it lasts much
    longer. Great for door hinges and tons of other things. If your car
    doors freeze shut in winter, spray some of this on the door gasket,
    and no more frozen doors. It costs a buck or two more than WD40, but
    is well worth the price.
     
  16. Guest

    I forgot to mention.

    CLEAN the CPU fan. There might be some dust bunnies stuck in there.
    If you got an air compressor, use that. if not, use the vaccuum
    CAREFULLY.
     
  17. Guest

    You mean they lie about their balls? <lol>
     
  18. Guest

    Kerosene and animal fats to be specific.
     
  19. I agree. I've seen fans where a buildup of dust deposit on the blades throws
    them out of balance, making the fan noisy and rapidly wearing out the
    bearing.
     
  20. Silicone oil is OK, but you might run into compatibility problems
    with the residual mineral oil left in the bearings. I prefer to
    use 5W30 synthetic motor oil. Its detergent additives dissolve
    the old dried out oil, and an excellent oil is left behind.
     
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