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night light bulb color

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by [email protected], Apr 5, 2008.

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  1. Guest

    A couple years ago I replaced most of the night lights I have installed
    with red bulbs (C7 size). Only the ones in the bathrooms keep white.
    Many of them are always on, and many have a light sensor to come on only
    when dark. I found this to be more comfortable on my eyes when walking
    around at night. During Christmas, I put green in half of them. The
    only catch is the colored bulbs are only available during Christmas.
     
  2. Jeff Jonas

    Jeff Jonas Guest

    A couple years ago I replaced most of the night lights
    Clever! I adore red lights (but not when I'm driving).
    I saw pink night light bulbs at Target but the prices were rather high.
    The best time to get such bulbs is about a week after Christmas
    when the replacement bulb sets are 1/2 price or less
    at K-mart, CVS, etc.

    The nixie folks once discussed dying/painting glass colors.
    I forgot what industrial product did the job
    but nail polish ought to work for night light bulbs.

    The only time I had a bulb explode
    was a dollar store night light bulb!
    No more "no-name" bulbs for me!

    What's with all these 4 watt lamps instead of 7 watts?
     
  3. You have a few colored C7s going all night every night?

    That sounds like an application for LEDs.

    If I needed colored nightlights, I would retrofit some white LED ones of
    a brand that I trust with colored LEDs.
    I estimate half a watt to 1 watt saved per dollar spent, more if I bet
    that dollar store LED nightlights or ones that I make from my junkbox
    parts won't burn my house down. Spending a dollar to save a watt 4,380
    hours a year has payback period close to 2 years at typical residential
    electricity rates in most of the USA, if I figure right.

    Even if rate of return on retrofitting colored C7 nightlights is less
    than that of good stock index mutual funds, colored C7 lamps running 4,000
    hours a year with luminous efficacy less than 2 lumens/watt rubs me the
    wrong way!

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  4. A few supermarkets and at least a few drugstores have pink and light
    blue C7 nightlight lamps.

    They aren't dirt cheap!

    For that matter, I usually see at the supermarket closest to my day job
    different prices between pink and light blue! IIRC, blue costs more
    there!

    What gives? Is gender identity more crucial for boys? Like male child
    molesters are more evil if they molest boys, while children molested by
    male molesters are mostly girls?
    I like to think of "Colorine", a product in theater/stage supply shops
    used for "painting" bulbs. (Yes, that product line is intended for
    coloring only the glass part of a lamp - and I know that in this newsgroup
    and in its relevant industry a "lightbulb" is usually called a "lamp" - at
    least in North America by most English-speaking "technical types" outside
    the automotive industry.)
    4-watt C7s have been around for quite a while. Have you noticed that
    nightlights that accept C7 lamps often have shades? Even 4-watt 120V
    incandescents are rather bright for nightlights, with luminous output
    around 15 lumens.

    And last December, I noticed a lot of 5 watt colored C7s.

    There is a 3 watt 120V incandescent filament. I wonder if it costs too
    much more than wattages a little higher for low price mass market items?
    The luminous output of even that one is at least plenty for most
    nightlight use!

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  5. Guest

    |> A couple years ago I replaced most of the night lights
    |> I have installed with red bulbs (C7 size).
    |
    | Clever! I adore red lights (but not when I'm driving).
    |
    |>... During Christmas, I put green in half of them.
    |>The only catch is the colored bulbs are only available during Christmas.
    |
    | I saw pink night light bulbs at Target but the prices were rather high.
    | The best time to get such bulbs is about a week after Christmas
    | when the replacement bulb sets are 1/2 price or less
    | at K-mart, CVS, etc.

    Unfortunately, I've found that the places I checked (Wal-mart, Lowes)
    ran out of replacement C-7 tree lights.

    I could buy a box of 25 bulbs from one of the light bulb stores online
    that have them year round.


    | The nixie folks once discussed dying/painting glass colors.
    | I forgot what industrial product did the job
    | but nail polish ought to work for night light bulbs.
    |
    | The only time I had a bulb explode
    | was a dollar store night light bulb!
    | No more "no-name" bulbs for me!

    You get what you pay for. I bet the explosion was not all that spectacular.
    If I paid more, I'd expect a nice big **BOOM** instead of a little *pop* :)


    | What's with all these 4 watt lamps instead of 7 watts?

    I buy the 4 watt ones.

    I'm also looking for 230 volt ones. Seems Europe has completely phased
    out the C-7 style. I'm just wanting them to have 1 watt ones. Red would
    work fairly well with the lower color temperature of a 4 watt 230 volt
    bulb running on 120 volts. But maybe the thinner longer filament needed
    to do 4 watts is just too big for a small bulb like C-7.

    FYI, I do have some 3 volt bulbs in the very same C-7 socket and bulb size.
    Maybe that is what you got at the dollar store? They are used in electric
    "candles" that use 2 AA batteries. It has a clear (not frosted) glass and
    a very short filament. Given that there is a supply of such bulbs, maybe
    I should look into building a multi-bulb fixtured based on this. Either I
    need to get a 3-volt step-down transformer or wire a few in series to run
    them on common 12-volt step-down transformers.

    I had this idea for a very small "flashlight". It would just be a small
    tiny box with 2 LEDs in series and one resistor to limit current with the
    other side of it having the connections to attach a 9-volt battery. Maybe
    the LEDs could be directly wired right to the little board they put such
    connectors on for various old broken gadgets.
     
  6. Guest

    | Jeff Jonas wrote...
    |> The nixie folks once discussed dying/painting glass colors.
    |> I forgot what industrial product did the job
    |> but nail polish ought to work for night light bulbs.
    |
    | Rosco Colorine is designed to colour lamps up to 40watts by hand
    | dipping.
    | Available in 8 colours plus clear and can be mixed to produce custom
    | colours.
    | www.rosco.com/us/scenic/colorine.asp
    | www.rosco.com/us/technotes/scenic/colorine_faq.asp

    Nice. These are the guys that have the clear fluorescent paint I saw
    demonstrated in high school ages ago, but could never find when I wanted
    some.
     
  7. Guest

    |
    |>A couple years ago I replaced most of the night lights I have installed
    |>with red bulbs (C7 size). Only the ones in the bathrooms keep white.
    |>Many of them are always on, and many have a light sensor to come on only
    |>when dark. I found this to be more comfortable on my eyes when walking
    |>around at night. During Christmas, I put green in half of them. The
    |>only catch is the colored bulbs are only available during Christmas.
    |
    | You have a few colored C7s going all night every night?

    Yes.


    | That sounds like an application for LEDs.

    Yes.


    | If I needed colored nightlights, I would retrofit some white LED ones of
    | a brand that I trust with colored LEDs.

    I have not yet found any I trust.


    | I estimate half a watt to 1 watt saved per dollar spent, more if I bet
    | that dollar store LED nightlights or ones that I make from my junkbox
    | parts won't burn my house down. Spending a dollar to save a watt 4,380
    | hours a year has payback period close to 2 years at typical residential
    | electricity rates in most of the USA, if I figure right.

    OTOH, this is a very tiny part of the overall energy bill. Spending the
    effort in other areas could be more productive.


    | Even if rate of return on retrofitting colored C7 nightlights is less
    | than that of good stock index mutual funds, colored C7 lamps running 4,000
    | hours a year with luminous efficacy less than 2 lumens/watt rubs me the
    | wrong way!

    Otherwise I end up turning the main lights on when I do get up, and then
    leave them on for a few minutes while I wait to get accustomed to the light.
     
  8. TKM

    TKM Guest

    Look for the 7C7 or 4C7 lamps in neighborhood hardware stores. They stock
    them when the big box stores don't because there are still night lights that
    use them and people ask especially for the clear and white enamel versions.

    The 4 watt versions appeared several years ago as lamp companies looked
    through their product lines to see what might be done easily that would
    result in energy savings. Many night light aren't; they burn all the time
    so even a few watts can add up.

    Terry McGowan
     
  9. Guest

    | Look for the 7C7 or 4C7 lamps in neighborhood hardware stores. They stock
    | them when the big box stores don't because there are still night lights that
    | use them and people ask especially for the clear and white enamel versions.

    The white and clear versions are readily available in most places. Grocery
    stores, WalMart, Target, etc. It's the COLOR ones that disappear right after
    Christmas and become hard to find. I want RED!
     
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