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NEW YAHOO GROUP: Full Spectrum Lighting

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by Lady Liberty, Feb 11, 2006.

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  1. How appropriate: a *yahoo* group for something only yahoos believe in.
     
  2. Steve Spence

    Steve Spence Guest

    WebMD suggests these products as therapy for reducing the effects of
    Seasonal Affective Disorder. Are you suggesting they are incorrect?
     
  3. ....and haven't got a clue what the difference is between
    high colour temperature (which is mostly what's offered)
    and full spectrum (which is mostly a misused term).
     
  4. Eric Gisin

    Eric Gisin Guest

    The term "full spectrum lighting" is only used by quacks.
    Engineers use CRI and colour temp to describe light quality.

    Any high-intensity light source is benefical.
    You could put a 250W (25,000 lumen) metal-halide in your living room,
    instead of sitting in front of 5,000 lumen light box.
     
  5. Has anyone found or proposed a bandwidth or a response curve shape for
    the cirtopic response?

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
  6. I've got some full spectrum SAD compliant CFL's here if anyone is
    interested. They radiate great feelings of wellness from conventional
    BC lampholders.

    There's some writing on the side of them that says:-

    Pound-blasters
    11W 240V 999mA
    Cos phi <0.1
    6400K (+/- 50%)
    Life 15,000 hours.
    Not guaranteed under all operating conditions. (Powered for instance.)

    At 20 UKP each inclusive of shipping they're a real bargain and will
    make you and your children the envy of the neighbourhood.

    These can also be used to make colloidal silver olive oil if dipped in
    orgone energised cluster water and poked with a lost cubit. It's a
    little known fact that the Egyptian goddesses used CFL's to make the
    earth spin faster during the 1960's. By buying my overpriced lamps you
    can recreate this effect and fill your families heads with gorgon power
    beams.
     
  7. TKM

    TKM Guest

    And not only the spectral response curve, but also the intensity, duration,
    timing (when the light should be applied) and the distribution of light over
    the eye?

    Light is energy. To have any effect on the eye or body, you have to know
    the "dose". Spectrum is just one part of the dose -- and it may not be
    particularly important compared to the other factors. Where's the rest of
    the information?

    Terry McGowan
     
  8. I wouldn't dismiss the possibility that the details of the
    SPD have more importance than can be described by the CCT
    and CRI. However, the problem with "full spectrum" is that
    it is an undefined term that means different things to
    different people and therefore can be anything that a
    company wants it to be. The term is worthless, not the
    concept that different SPDs that have the same or similar
    CCT and CRI may be perceived differently by people or even
    have some beneficial effect in some situations.

    --
    Vic Roberts
    http://www.RobertsResearchInc.com
    To reply via e-mail:
    replace xxx with vdr in the Reply to: address
    or use e-mail address listed at the Web site.

    This information is provided for educational purposes only.
    It may not be used in any publication or posted on any Web
    site without written permission.
     
  9. Yes, the link I posted recently to Dr. Berman's 2005 paper has a
    response curve near the end of it.

    www.ceisp.com/simposium/pdf/simposiumCIE_Leon/ponencias/002pastvision...[/QUOTE]

    Thanks for this! Looks like you caught me a bit asleep at the switch...

    I had to go to Google to find your link in full. The link in full split
    into 2 lines is:

    http://www.ceisp.com/simposium/pdf/simposiumCIE_Leon/ponencias/
    002pastvision.pdf

    Meanwhile, the bandwidth of this one in a graph that I saw there appears
    only very slightly narrower than those for scotopic and photopic human
    responses.
    This makes me think that a lamp with high CRI and scotopic/photopic
    ratio close to that of daylight (of same CCT as lamp in question) should
    have cirtopic/photopic function "in the ballpark" of daylight of same CCT.

    - Don Klipstein ()
     
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