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New ultracap on the market... how does this relate to the EV market?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Coleston, May 22, 2007.

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  1. Coleston

    Coleston Guest

    Maxwell has released a 125 and 390 volt version of thier 2.7V boost
    cap with 63F of capacitance.

    What does this translate to in terms of kWH?

    Is it worthwhile to start doing advance dc 8" or 9" motors in a 120
    Volt system with a couple of these thrown in as well?

    Or is it still only for regenerative braking applications?

    Thing tips the scales at .7m / .4m / .3/ and weighs 53 kilos, jesus.
    Thats like 4 extra batteries, a 168 volt system is prolly better.

    What kind of capacitance would something like that require to be
    feasable for EV's?

    200F? 500F?

    -Coleston
     
  2. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Capacitors store *ENERGY* not *POWER*. Get your units of measure right to begin
    with please.

    The equation for stored energy in a capacitor is 1/2.C.V^2.

    Graham
     
  3. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    You can't run an EV on capacitors for energy storage alone. At least not for
    longer than maybe a minute or two.

    I suggest you learn how to do the sums. It will become rapidly apparent that
    'gee whiz' product releases that daft ppl get hold of and think something magic
    has happened are in fact quite pedestrian in their claims.

    Graham
     
  4. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Eeysore TROLLING Tenth Wit ""



    ** ROTFL !!!!

    " kWh " IS a measure of ENERGY - fuckwit !!

    1 kWh = 3.6 megajoules.



    ** Get your head out of your ARSE - IDIOT !!




    ........ Phil
     
  5. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Duh, I missed the h ! I'm so used to ppl in the energy groups failing to
    understand the differences.

    390V and 63F > 1.3 kWh. It won't take a car very far.

    Graham
     
  6. Jasen

    Jasen Guest

    call it 9.6MJ, It'd take you 1/4 mile plenty fast enough! (compare it to a 1000KW dragster)

    it's probably better suited to rubbish collection trucks, busses, and
    other heavy vehicles that do a lot of start-stop and would benefit from
    regenerative braking.
     
  7. Boris Mohar

    Boris Mohar Guest

    For comparison:

    http://home.earthlink.net/~jimlux/energies.htm
     
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