Connect with us

new to circuits ?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by carte, Dec 4, 2012.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. carte

    carte

    5
    0
    Dec 4, 2012
    hello , im new to the building modding circuits i wanted to start simple with
    guitar pedals.

    my question is how do you know if a simple circuit is digital or analog
    in a pedal if not otherwise specified ?
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,496
    2,837
    Jan 21, 2010
    You need to look at the schematic, or look at the parts used and make an assessment based on what these parts are typically used for.
     
  3. carte

    carte

    5
    0
    Dec 4, 2012
    hello thx , i don't have a way to get good photos
    of the circuit

    there is only 2 chips that read

    458de
    jrc
    x1126

    if this isn't enough info its no prob. i appreciate the reply's and very grateful
     
  4. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,271
    Nov 28, 2011
    Are you sure it's "458"? If it's 4558, that is a standard component called a "dual op-amp". It's totally analogue.

    Simple pedals like fuzz/distortion, wah-wah, filtering and so on are normally analogue, unless they're very high-tech (and expensive), in which case the processing could be done using a DSP (digital signal processor). Pedals that are more likely to be digital (at least partly) are flanger/phaser, echo/delay, and advanced audio processing. Digital pedals will contain ICs much bigger than those little 8-pin devices.

    If you haven't already, search the web for guitar effects pedals. There are hundreds of circuits out there.
     
  5. carte

    carte

    5
    0
    Dec 4, 2012
    cool thx , i might had left a # out but don't think so
    i thought it might be analog but was not sure.

    it has surface resistors "machine mfg" like cpu boards
    instead of the ones i usually see in pedals. would be
    difficult to mod these pedals
     
  6. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,271
    Nov 28, 2011
    Right. Most modern, mass-produced electronic products use SMT (surface-mount technology). THT (through-hole technology) is mostly limited to hobbyists and some ultra-budget Chinese stuff.

    Why are you so interested in the idea of modifying these pedals? They're generally pretty well-designed and there is little need to modify them. You would learn more by MAKING pedals than by trying to find reasons to modify existing pedals.

    I suggest you search the web for designs for pedals, and pedal boxes with built-in switches, potentiometers, connectors etc.
     
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Try this guys site for DIY pedal designs, very newbie orientated and clean...

    http://members.shaw.ca/roma/

    Click under projects then guitar, several classic analog effects...
     
  8. carte

    carte

    5
    0
    Dec 4, 2012
    i didn't really want to mod this particular pedal rather the "smt"was new
    to me in a stompbox pedal usually stomboxes are "THT" unless there
    digital like you mention it was odd to see for analog .

    already learned some new term's :)

    ill check out those references your all very kind i appreciate it .
     
  9. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Through hole assembly is only economical for small or hobbyist runs to avoid tooling cost and overhead... Once you mass produce there is no comparison in the cost savings and time savings of using surface mount components...

    So for higher end low volume pedals you might still see through hole, but or mass produced high volume stuff I would be surprised to find through hole assembly...

    I still vividly remember the first day I saw a surface mount machine populating a panel of boards...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=fvwp&v=nah4BQ9y8IY&NR=1

    That video pails in comparison to seeing it happen right before your eyes... Just like the camera you can't even focus on the turret placing the chips, it's mind boggling fast...
     
  10. Yoa01

    Yoa01

    214
    0
    Jun 18, 2012
    I've actually been working on building guitar pedals while building synthesizers. Most of my designs are simple, but I have a TON of schematics on hand and can help you figure out what each part does.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-