Connect with us

New Electrical Service Box Question

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Robert11, Apr 16, 2006.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Robert11

    Robert11 Guest

    Hello:

    Moved into an older home that has 100 amp service.

    Will be hiring an electrician to update it to 150 or 200 amps, but would
    like
    to get some comments and information on how to handle the following problem,
    before I do so.

    The present service box is recessed into an area that does not have the
    physical
    room to accept a larger box. Not practical to cut a larger opening there.

    However, plenty of room about six feet away.

    But, all the wires coming in for the 25 or so circuits do not have the
    length to
    make it to a new, six foot distant, location.

    What are some options in handling this, please ?

    If new extension pieces of wire are just spliced onto the old wires using
    wire-nuts, these nuts can't be just left
    dangling in space, can they ?

    Or, if they are all packed into the old box (e.g., with the breaker panel
    removed) it
    probably violates some codes as to the number of wire nuts in a given volume
    (or does it ?)

    How would / should this type of problem normally be handled ?

    Thanks,
    Bob
     
  2. Dale Farmer

    Dale Farmer Guest

    When your electrician comes in to do the pre-work inspection, he
    should discuss all these options with you, and let you know what they are.

    --Dale
     
  3. ehsjr

    ehsjr Guest

    Five options come to mind, in no particular order:
    1) Don't upgrade
    2) Rewire from the new service to the first junction on
    each branch
    3) Pull the cables from the existing service to the attic
    or basement, and splice new runs from the new service
    to them in as many j-boxes as are needed.
    4) Splice them in the existing service which you convert
    to a j-box
    5) Install new service and feed old service from it
    as a sub-panel.

    I'm guessing that 5) may be your best bet. If necessary,
    one or two existing circuits could be routed to the new
    service.

    Ed
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-