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need suggestions for next textbook

Discussion in 'Electronics Homework Help' started by maark6000, Aug 24, 2012.

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  1. maark6000

    maark6000

    23
    0
    Feb 8, 2012
    so i'm finishing up my "introduction to electronics" textbook, and I'm looking for suggestions on where to turn next. the book I just went thru started at the basics, ohm's law, kirchhoff's laws, series / parallel resistors, network theorems (mesh, nodal, etc.), transformers, caps, and inductors. But no diodes, transistors, mosfets, and certainly no logic stuff (which I assume is it's own book).

    There are a lot of books out there that are recommended but seem a bit too advanced for me. Analog IC Design by Gray, Meyer for example has my head swimming on page 2. "Art of Electronics" doesn't really seem like a teaching textbook, more like a fun reference book for those who already have an EE degree. I need something that explains things very simply and clearly, and gives good examples and problems to solve to cement in the knowledge.

    At this point, I'm thinking about getting "Electronic Devices" (9th ed, conv. current vers.) by Thomas Floyd. But I thought I'd see what else might be recommended.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,448
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    That's weird. I find "The art of electronics" to be a most readable text that doesn't rely on much more mathematical understanding than simple arithmetic. It certainly doesn't require that you are an EE. To my mind, what you say you want *is* that book. But maybe it's not suited for you.
     
  3. maark6000

    maark6000

    23
    0
    Feb 8, 2012
    I have the Art of Electronics, and one day I'll be ready to go through it. But as an example of the way I think AoE breezes through the fundamentals, the topics covered in the 500+ page book i just went thru are given just 12 pages in AoE. AoE is the deep end of the pool for me, and I'm not ready to be pushed in. :)
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,448
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, maybe I overestimated at what point you are.

    But AOE describes things quite simply, and the book IS NOT presented in a way that you need to understand chapters 1 to 3 before reading chapter 4 for example.

    Take a look at Chapter 2 where it starts describing transistors.

    I'm pretty sure that Chapter 1 is the most mathematical of any of the chapters, and I certainly didn't read (even less understand) much of it prior to reading (and getting lots from) subsequent chapters.

    Having said that, if it's beyond your current level, then it's beyond your current level.

    However when you *are* ready for this book, it will ease you into stuff that you might find far more opaque in other more mathematical texts.
     
  5. maark6000

    maark6000

    23
    0
    Feb 8, 2012
    yeah, i'm looking forward to having a clue about what they're talking about. ;)

    So I found the Floyd book (textbook and lab manual, 8th ed.) on the barnes & noble site for under $40 with shipping, so I'm going to dive into that.

    The runners up / possible future reads were:

    "Electronic Principles" By Albert Malvino
    "Analog Integrated Circuit Design" By Carusone, Johns & Martin
    "Fundamentals of Microelectronics" B. Razavi

    These get high marks in the amazon reviews.

    thanks for the input. :)
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,448
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    When you get it, please come back and give us a review of it. I think we should set up a sticky thread for book reviews since we do get a number of people asking about them.
     
  7. maark6000

    maark6000

    23
    0
    Feb 8, 2012
    that's a great idea. We could also have a little section for the known typos (esp. in the homework problems) since the publishers never seem to care to fix those from edition to edition.

    Set up the sticky and I'll give you a hearty review of "Introduction to Electronics" by Stephen Harsany. Only 5 more chapters to go...

    :)
     
  8. hca

    hca

    15
    1
    Aug 28, 2012
    I recommend "Electrical Engineering : Principles and Applications" by Allan R Hambley (2011 - Pearson). First part of the book is the general intro to electrical engineering
    after that you have:
    ch. 6 Frequency Response, Bode Plots and Resonance
    ch. 7 Logic Circuits
    ch. 8 Microcomputers
    ch. 9 Computer Based Instrumentation Systems
    ch.10 Diodes
    ch.11 Amplifiers
    ch.12 Field Effect Transistors
    ch. 13 Bipolar Junction Transistors
    ch.14 Operational Amplifiers
    ch.15 Magnetic Circuits and Transformers
    ch. 16 DC Machines
    ch.17 AC Machines

    The book also has a very good companion website with video solutions and a lot of worked examples
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2012
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,448
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    Here you go!

    https://www.electronicspoint.com/book-reviews-t251799.html
     
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