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Need more Program Memory

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by sideburn, Jul 18, 2013.

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  1. sideburn

    sideburn

    75
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    Jun 14, 2013
    Hey all,

    I have a project thats using a PIC16F88 and I've filled up the flash program memory so I am looking for a similar chip but with more flash memory.

    I found the 16F1847 and it is very similar looking to me but it is hard for me to tell how much different it is than the 16F88. It says it has 14k but in other places it says it has 8.Does anyone know if this one would work for me or of a 16F88 like chip with more memory?

    I am using about 9 i/o ports and the USART.
     
  2. p.erasmus

    p.erasmus

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    0
    Jul 18, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013
  3. sideburn

    sideburn

    75
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    Jun 14, 2013
    weird its cheaper than a 16f88
    why are there so many!?
    i mean like the 16f628A identical to a 16F88 but no debugger and less starage for about 10c less why even have that
     
  4. p.erasmus

    p.erasmus

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    0
    Jul 18, 2013
    It not weird at all,the 16F88 is an old chip and the older they get the more expensive they get ,as the volume in sales are going down,most recent version of a micro family are always cheaper than old version and models.

    Microchip has a wide range or micro's to fit each and every need a person could have ,
    this is the reason you should use the parts selector on their web site to help you choose
    the corect Micro for your needs that icludes pin numbers,peripherals and Memory ect
     
  5. sideburn

    sideburn

    75
    2
    Jun 14, 2013
    That's how I found the 16f1847, using the parts selector page.
    But if you compare the data sheets side by side they are written complete differently. Anyway seems like they have way too many. The 16f88 and the 16f628a are practically identical except no debugger and less program memory for a few penny's less. Why bother.
     
  6. p.erasmus

    p.erasmus

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    Jul 18, 2013
    As said before the 16F88 is a very old part and not recommended for new designs the 16F628 is a newer device also not that new anymore however that is the reason they are cheaper than the 16F88,

    My be in your opinion they have to many devices but into 10 million other peoples point of view they still have to little devices .
    Secondly people designing production products do not use the 16F88 since a few years already but MCHP can not remove the 16F88 from the portfolio as there are companies that has products in production which use this device ,they cant just stop to make the 16F88 and that the reason why they show on the web page that the 16F88 is not recommended for new designs .it is only in the portfolio because the reason I told you above ,move on and use a newer device
     
  7. sideburn

    sideburn

    75
    2
    Jun 14, 2013
    I see, makes sense i guess.. I still tink they could just disconue the ones that obsolete and can be replaced with the newer, better, cheeper, chips that have the same pinouts so you could easily just swap the part out with the newer one and not have to make any changes to your hardware or firmware.. But anyway, moving on.. I've bought some 16F1847's to replace my 16F88's and didn't have to make that many alterations to my code. Now I'll have twice the program memory. Thanks for your info..
     
  8. p.erasmus

    p.erasmus

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    Jul 18, 2013
    :) you are welcome ,
     
  9. gorgon

    gorgon

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    Jun 6, 2011
    Even if this is a simple solution for you, it doesn't mean that it is like this for everyone. These chip are used in industrial devices, many of them are approved for different use and conditions. These approvals cost 10s of thousands of dollars, and the company manufacturing the devices need to produce over many years, without changes. Changing a MCU needs a new revision of the approval, and extras costs.

    Even if a component is marked 'not recommended for new designs', it's not obsolete, just mature, in the production cycle.
    Getting EOL (End Of Life) warnings and last buy dates, is a real pain for us working in the industry. So we always try to use components with a guaranteed life of at least 10-15 years.

    The 3-5 years hyped mobile telephone components, are out of the question.
     
  10. p.erasmus

    p.erasmus

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    0
    Jul 18, 2013
    Thanks Gorgon thats what I was trying to say although a device is old it can not just be discontinued for the reasons you and I explained ,Luckly my experience with Microchip they keep parts up to 15 years at least, the old 16C54 is still available today after many many years
     
  11. gorgon

    gorgon

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    24
    Jun 6, 2011
    You're welcome.

    The first PIC I used was the 16C54 back in 1993/4. Even with OTP it was a far cry from the old masked ROM versions from GI, in the pre Microchip times.
    I have other favourite brands, but the PICs comes handy at occasions.
     
  12. sideburn

    sideburn

    75
    2
    Jun 14, 2013
    Makes sense. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
     
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