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Need help with vacuum repair (TBT3V1P1)

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Butters, Apr 4, 2020.

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  1. Butters

    Butters

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    0
    Apr 4, 2020
    Hi all, I have a Vax 32v cordless vacuum that has a separate motor for the brush bar. Recently, the brush bar started cutting out, so I opened it up and found a loose connection in the circuit, soldered and reinsulated it and put it back together. However, now whenever I connect the head to the rest of the vacuum, the brush bar operates whether the brush button on the main body is on/off or indeed if the main power switch is on/off. Is anybody able to help and tell me what has happened or what I have done wrong?
     
  2. dave9

    dave9

    881
    217
    Mar 5, 2017
    Probably reconnected to the wrong spot. Look at the circuit board and trace it from the brush button, probably one side has constant power from the battery (when the main suction motor is on?), so trace the other switched contact till you find a place to solder the output wire to the brush motor.
     
  3. Butters

    Butters

    2
    0
    Apr 4, 2020
    Hiya dave9, thanks for the input :) I didn't go near the circuit board, just the wiring in the head, I'll try and explain better.
    The head contains the separate motor for the brush bar, the connector that I reattached is housed in the head also and makes the circuit when attached to the main body. The main body contains the battery and the has the switches. Noting that nothing in the main body has been changed or was broken before the head was fixed, When I now attach the head, the motor within operates even though the main body is not even switched on. Hope this is clearer and I really hope you can help :D
     
  4. dave9

    dave9

    881
    217
    Mar 5, 2017
    Okay, but then it seems like a coincidence that you have a second problem. If the switch to turn it on is in the head, then power is going through it when it shouldn't, so I suspect a switch failure. Use a multimeter to check whether the switch is closed circuit when it should be off, and take care doing it if this is a high voltage... most aren't, but in recent years some cordless *things* have gone to 40V or even more. It does not need to be powered on to check switch continuity with a multimeter.

    I suppose with these plastic shell type designs, there could be a different problem related to the switch, that the internal baffling that holds it in place could have broken so the button isn't cycling it on and off as it should. In that case I would build a partition out of a piece of plastic and epoxy to hold the switch back where it should be. Heh, it would much easier to figure this out by looking at it rather than speculating. Can you upload the vac and attach it to a post? A picture won't be enough, I need the actual vac to know when it's fixed. ;)

    The odd thing is it operates if even the main switch is off, so it could be a bit more complicated, but still a matter of opening the head and checking the switches, then if nothing visual is wrong at some point you'll need the battery in to trace where power keeps going when it should've stopped with the switches off.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2020
  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,555
    1,853
    Sep 5, 2009

    some sharp and well lit photos of the insides where you worked on it would be a great help :)
     
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