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Need Help With Ozone Generator Rheostat Please.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Mark Carter, Jun 21, 2014.

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  1. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter

    4
    0
    Jun 21, 2014
    Hello,

    I am in the process of building an ozone generator for mold/odor control and am in need of two on/off/rheostat/voltage control switches for this application. The problem is that I can install them, but I do not know how to size them.

    The first one will be needed to turn off and on, and adjust the speed for a computer case fan.

    The specs for the fan are as follows.

    Voltage: 110-120 AC
    Frequency: 50-60Hz
    Current: 0.17/0.18 Amps (AW)
    Model: AX12381HB-C
    Manufacturer: Adda

    The second will be needed to turn off and on, and adjust the voltage for a power supply/transformer for the ozone generator plates.

    The specs for the power supply/transformer are as follows.

    Power: 90W
    Frequency: In: 50-60Hz Out: 18 Khz
    Voltage: 220V / 110V
    Output: 3.1 Kv

    The specs shown above are the only specs I have for both components.

    Images of the components and and drawing in the configuration of the components being used are attached.

    Thank You for your help. It is greatly appreciated.

    Mark Carter

    3-5g-h-ceramic-ozone-plate-for-air-purifier.jpg 110 Volt Transformer.jpg Fan.jpg Configuration 1.jpg Configuration 2.jpg
     
  2. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

    690
    25
    Oct 2, 2011
    The fan speed can be controlled via a regular speed controller, close to a light bulb dimmer.
    The high voltage supply can't be adjusted afterwhile, the manufacturer as to provide the option (who technically is implemented before the voltage multiplication).
     
  3. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter

    4
    0
    Jun 21, 2014
    OLIVE2222 Thank You for your input.

    The components will be placed within a 5"X5"X14" PVC housing with limited space, thus requiring the smaller sized rheostat as opposed to the bigger light bulb dimmer.

    What I need to know are the specs or the size needed.

    Also - I have been told that the voltage could be controlled before the transformer, is this not correct?

    Mark
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    I have seen dimmers that fit in the space used by a standard light switch (the switch alone, not the plate its attached to) so a dimmer should win on the size issue.

    Varying the input voltage to the transformer is a VERY non-trivial matter.

    Get over rheostats, they're not practical.
     
  5. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter

    4
    0
    Jun 21, 2014
    (*Steve*) Thank You for your input.

    As I previously stated, the components will be placed within a 5"X5"X14" PVC housing with limited space, so the dimmer switch would be a loss on the size issue.

    If varying the input voltage to the transformer is a VERY non-trivial matter, what about varying the output voltage from the transformer?

    Also - while I am not "married" to rheostats, they had been suggested to me by three electronic component vendors due to their ability to handle higher voltages. However, for some reason, they were unable to suggest a specific one for my application, leading to my reason for posting here.

    So, while rheostats may be impractical, I am limited by size constraints. I also need to find a way to vary the voltage to the dielectrics.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    If you can find a rheostat smaller than about a cubic inch, go for it.

    Playing with the output voltage would be worse.

    Do you know what the input current is to the transformer? That will dictate the required resistance and power rating of a rheostat. You may be surprised.

    Why do you need to vary the voltage to the "dielectrics"? (when you say that, you're actually saying "insulators" or "capacitors" -- I'm sure that's not what you mean)

    Are they designed to do this? How does the manufacturer recommend you do it?
     
  7. Mark Carter

    Mark Carter

    4
    0
    Jun 21, 2014
    Thanks again Steve.

    As shown in the specs, the unit will be supplied by typical 110 volt household current.

    No, the dielectrics (blue ceramic plates shown in the first image) are what actually produce the ozone gas via electrical discharge.

    The variation of the current to the dielectric is necessary to vary the amount of ozone produced by the dielectrics.

    (Attached is an image of a similar unit and of a dielectric with current applied and discharging ozone gas.)

    While I am not sure of the transformer or the dielectric being "designed" to be used in an application where the current is being varied, I have been told that it can be done.

    I just need to know what components will work best to accomplish varying both the fan speed and the ozone production.

    I have seen other household ozone generators with some type of rotary switches being used for fan speed control, and for ozone output.



    Ozone Plate Discharge.jpg

    Unit.jpg
     
  8. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

    690
    25
    Oct 2, 2011
    The fan speed controller should include an SCR+a heatsink, a potentiometer, capacitors, resistors, all sized to handle main voltage.
    This will not be super small. What you can do is a mockup with a speed controller and a switch to turn off the second dielectric and test it.
     
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