Connect with us

Need help identifying a component

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by bigshaff44, Sep 13, 2010.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    I need help identififying a bad component out of a dehydrater. It looks like it might be a diode or a small fuse? It was inline on onr leg of the power. It is white and round with the following markings on it:
    186 T ( the T is inside of a triangle)
    UMI
    2A 250V
    169 Degrees C E1
    I would really appreciate any help with this and if you could tell me were I could I buy a replacement that would be even better. Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mitchekj

    Mitchekj

    288
    0
    Jan 24, 2010
    That is a tape measure.

    (Joke, I joke, it looks like it may be a thermal fuse.)
     
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,501
    2,841
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, it makes sense, I couldn't find any similar part though when I looked.

    169C is awfully hot. I'd hope that some portion of that temperature comes from self-heating effects, not just ambient temperature!.
     
  4. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    That makes sense. It was right next to the heating elements. I don't know much about thermal fuses, but I am guessing that it is to protect against excessive heat rather than high current. Is it safe to say that I can just get a replacement fuse rated at the same temp, amps, and voltage and I should be fine?
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,501
    2,841
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, if it's near a heating element then it's probably there to protect in the case of thermostat failure or maybe even fan failure.

    If it has failed then try to determine why.

    You should look for a unit with similar temperature (within a few degrees if possible -- pick a lower temperature one in preference to higher) and at least the same voltage and current.

    I presume the device has a normal fuse to protect against over-current.
     
  6. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    It's just a small food dehydrater. It has a small fan an some heating elements. I didn't see any other fuses. I bypassed this one with alligator clips and it worked fine.
     
  7. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    522
    Jan 15, 2010
    It's a thermal fuse. It's whole purpose is to open, so you don't have a fire. You BETTER replace it. The 169 degrees is in farenheit. The other letters are manufacurer codes for physical size and whatever else they wanted to designate.
    It's normal for those things to go. They're not expensive, and will keep you from burning your house down. I'd buy a couple replacements, for the next time it might happen.
     
  8. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    Any suggestions on were to buy them? Are you sure it's not 169 degrees Celsius? It says 169° C.
     
  9. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    522
    Jan 15, 2010
    Think about it.
    Food dehydraters operate at about 140 degrees F. I've never seen one that operated above 155 degrees farenheit. 168 degrees C, is 336 degrees farenheit. You wouldn't be dehydrating at that temperature, you'd be COOKING the stuff.
    Any good appliance repair supply shop will carry a wide variety of thermal fuses, ....and most regular electronics supply stores will carry the most common values.
    Thermal fuses open often, .... it's a safety device.
    I'm not going to suggest going to a higher temp thermal fuse, because I don't know your dehydrater, or the possibility of making your dehydrater unsafe (fire hazard).
    I had a deep fryer that'd blow the thermal fuse once a year, ... as far as I was concerned, it was just the nature of the beast, and I tolerated it for safety's sake.
    Really, the thermal fuses are easy to find, and you have all the pertinent data, ... voltage and amperage limits, as well as the temperature. Shop around, they go for as little as $1.50, up to almost $6 each if you buy from some crook.
     
  10. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    Good point. I'll take your advice, I definately don't want any fire hazards. Thanks
     
  11. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    522
    Jan 15, 2010
    It's a concern because the nature of the dehydrater, is to turn it on, and let it run for extended periods of time. If something happens, and you forget about it, there could be an overheating problem. Seems a slim possibility normally, but I wouldn't risk a fire when it's easy to eliminate the threat. People probably bypass these things reguarly (like you did with the alligator clips), with no problems. But why take the chance? It's cheap insurance.
    When you replace it, take the bad one with you to the store, maybe the guy behind the counter can put your mind at ease about the temperature rating.
     
  12. Zander

    Zander

    19
    0
    Sep 11, 2010
    You would get excessive heat from high current. It's heating up because of the molecular friction.

    If it really is a fuse, have you checked for continuity?

    What I don't understand is why it's not using a thermal overload, that would reset after the temperature came down but, not before it waited a few seconds (to avoid hunting).
     
  13. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Zander; do you understand the difference between heat and temperature? Please don't try to educate anyone here, but feel free to ask questions for your own education.
    If the temperature gets too high in that device then something is likely very wrong and for safety reasons the circuit should be permanently disabled, not repeatedly retried.
    Some obvious reasons the temperature may get too high is that the fan fails, or that someone dumps a cloth over the whole thing.
     
  14. bigshaff44

    bigshaff44

    9
    0
    Sep 13, 2010
    I ordered some online. I got two temp ratings with the intention of trying the lower temp first. I ordered 76°C (168°F) and 67°C (152°F). Thanks for the advice.
     
  15. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    522
    Jan 15, 2010
    You'll open the 152 degree thermal fuse quicker than the 168 degree.
    Your unit was designed for 168 degree cut off, ...you're wasting your time (and you'll soon have to replace) the 152 degree device, if you install it.
    It won't hurt your dehydrator, but it'll cause you aggrevation, having to replace the 152 degree thermal fuse relatively soon after installation.
    Just trying to save you some angst.
     
  16. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Imho the original fuse is 169 degrees Celsius like the picture says, so I'd figure that if the 152 F blows quickly then the 168 F will follow suit. 16 F is not much difference.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-