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Need help finding the right resistor

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by soul73, Oct 27, 2016.

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  1. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    Hey guys,

    I have a sampler (year of construction: circa 2000) with a broken resistor.

    Now I have problems recognizing the colors correctly as well as the tolerance ring. Fortunately I have the service manual of the sampler. But all this tells me about the resistor is the number 473.

    After some research I have then found that 473 stands for a 47 kΩ resistor. Unfortunately I am missing the specification of the tolerance.

    Can you help me?

    Here are some pics:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2016
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,702
    2,716
    Nov 17, 2011
    Welcome aboard EP.

    yellow-violet-orange = 473 = 47*10^3 -> 47kΩ, that's correct.

    But: the schematic shows a capacitor, not a resistor. Then the same color code means 47*10^3 pF = 47 nF.
    A capacitor at this position is more plausible than a resistor as it will filter the potentiometer's output signal.
    Also, for a capacitor a white tolerance band makes sense (it doesn't for a resistor): 10 % (see e.g. here).
     
  3. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    Hi Harald,

    Thanks for your reply.

    So it is a capacitor, great. Now the color code makes sense.

    Now I´ll need to find a store that carries this type of capacitor. Since I am a noob at electronics the amount of different capacitors on Mouser, farnell and the likes confuse me.

    EDIT: I now came up with this search on mouser: http://www.mouser.de/Passive-Components/Capacitors/_/N-5g7r?P=1z0wquaZ1z0x6d8Z1z0z819

    I am not sure which voltage rating I need to tick.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2016
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    It's hard to tell what voltage rating is required but it is likely to be fairly small. 10V or anything higher would likely be very safe.
     
  5. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    Hi Steve,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Strangely, the potentiometer works regardless of the damaged capacitor. Maybe I don´t really have to change it immediately?
     
  6. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,702
    2,716
    Nov 17, 2011
    The missing capacitor may result in increased noise...

    You don't have to use an an axial type of capacitor. A radial type, which I think is much easier to obtain, will work the same way. Leads can be bent to fit the existing holes or find one with matching pin pitch.
    Here's an example.
     
  7. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    I guess I should have mentioned that the potentiometer isn´t adjusting audio signals, it it adjusting different parameters in the sampler (such as attack, release, LFO speed, etc.).
     
  8. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,168
    727
    Aug 11, 2014
    What type capacitor is this, and is there an easy way to differentiate it from a resistor?

    If it wasn't for the schematic and the "c" marking on the board I'd think it was a resistor.
     
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    99.99999% of the time their pink body colour identifies it as a capacitor .... just one of those things you learn doing electronics
     
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  10. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    As I said, 10v or higher
     
  12. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    Steve, thanks a lot.

    I thought maybe a too high voltage rating will damage something, hence my question. :oops:

    Time to read up on capacitors I think.
     
  13. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
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    Jan 21, 2010
    No, just like putting tyres with a higher speed rating on your car doesn't make you go faster, placing a capacitor in a circuit that can withstand a higher voltage won't make that voltage magically appear.
     
  14. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,168
    727
    Aug 11, 2014
    Ok thanks.
    Perhaps the "pink" resistors I've seen were just faded or discolored beige or toupe?
    Again, anybody know what kind of cap it is? I assume it's non-polar.
     
  15. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    not sure of their makeup ... couldn't find anything obvious on google
    yes non-polar
     
  16. soul73

    soul73

    17
    2
    Oct 27, 2016
    Hey guys,

    I just wanted to let you know that I´ve changed the capacitor with this one (
    MLCC X7R 47nF 10% 50V RM5,08) and all is well.

    Thanks again for your help!
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2016
    chopnhack and davenn like this.
  17. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    5,025
    1,048
    Oct 5, 2014
    Apparently it's ceramic
     
    davenn likes this.
  18. harika

    harika

    2
    1
    Feb 15, 2016

    Thanks for your question....I never heard of the capacitors with color code, until i came through these articles in google http://www.tpub.com/neets/book2/3g.htm
    http://www.electronicshub.org/capacitor-color-codes/....though these two explained how to calculate the capacitance value , they did not show any circuit in real time using these capacitors..Ur question helped me.Thanks a lot
     
    davenn likes this.
  19. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    1,964
    Sep 5, 2009

    you must be a young lad ;)

    Dave
     
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