Connect with us

Name of "through PCB IC socket rows"

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by TTL, Aug 27, 2019.

  1. TTL

    TTL

    183
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    I'm trying to source a particular type of IC socket or pin row but am having little success as I don't know the component name....

    I'm looking for 28 and 32-pin sockets (15.24mm row spacing) with long legs so that they can further be plugged into another identical sized socket on another PCB. A sort of "through" IC socket or perhaps pin rows. What are these called, and if there are several options, what's the best solution for the purpose described above?
     
  2. TTL

    TTL

    183
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    I think I found something:
    [​IMG]
    "Wire wrap SIP socket". But I'm concerned about the thick, square shaped legs -won't they force themselves into a normal IC socket and eventually make each contact loose? Is there something similar with thinner legs?
     
  3. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,743
    1,130
    Aug 21, 2015
    Those are called machined pins, just use a set of them for constructing your primary IC socket and clip off the unnecessarily long leads.
    Then you do your add on above it, just as you were thinking.
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,401
    1,920
    Nov 17, 2011
    Look for female pin headers.
    Wire wrap sockets are meant to be used with a wire wrapping gun, not to be soldered to a pcb.
     
  5. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    2,743
    1,130
    Aug 21, 2015
    We don't know the interconnect " room" needed betweeen the two connectors, but the second option certainly leaves less "diddling" room.
     
  6. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,676
    454
    Jan 15, 2010
    Check the Mill-Max website, they make just about everything I've ever needed.
     
  7. TTL

    TTL

    183
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    I'm not sure what to look for. Perhaps I haven't explained well enough.

    I have a board like this:
    DMX_1675_50.jpg

    ... and I'm building a small adapter board which plugs into the leftmost EPROM IC socket.
    It'll look a bit like the adapter below (source: Boobip.com):
    [​IMG]

    The same page shows it using pin headers for mounting into a motherboard's IC socket:
    [​IMG]


    But.... I also want to the ability to plug the EPROM on top of the adapter and have it function exactly as before (in other words: an IC socket with legs that extend through the adapter PCB and finally goes into the original EPROM socket. At first I want to try if I can just plug them into the existing voice card socket, but if it ends up very loose I will have to consider desoldering it and permanently soldering the adapter directly into where that socket used to be.

    Apart from the wire wrap type legs (that Harald Kapp pointed out weren't designed for soldering into a PCB (and probably not for plugging into an IC socket either)) I haven't found anything similar but with thin legs.
    I'll keep on looking through the Mill Max website but so far I haven't found anything suitable.
     
  8. Externet

    Externet

    711
    145
    Aug 24, 2009
    There is also a cousin of the sockets, called ZFI -zero force insertion- that may be of your interest some day :
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,401
    1,920
    Nov 17, 2011
    You can get the female pin headers with extra long pins. Insert them from the top of the pcb so the pins reach a fair bit under the pcb. This way you can stack the pcbs as requested while you still can insert a chip on top.
     
  10. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,401
    1,920
    Nov 17, 2011
  11. TTL

    TTL

    183
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    The website you linked to isn't working at the moment, but from the link name it appears you're referring to Arduino stacking headers?
    [​IMG]
    So an EPROM/any IC can be inserted into the top of these?
    One potential problem is that the EPROM will be raised higher than with a normal socket and there might not be enough room for that as another PCB is placed next to the one I'll be placing the adapter in.

    A SIP socket with normal, thin legs appears to be what I'm looking for, but does such a thing exist?

    The male pin header suggested by Bluejets would work if I was to offset one of the EPROMs (instead of having it go directly into its original socket again (but through the PCB) -as shown in the second photo of that BBC model B adapter earlier in this thread. If no suitable pin header is found that may be the only way to go.
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2019
  12. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,401
    1,920
    Nov 17, 2011
    right.
    You can get these with smaller plastic bodies, too.
     
  13. TTL

    TTL

    183
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    I finally found out that the stacked PCB will be too high (there's another PCB next to) so I've opted for a DIP header with a ribbon cable connected to the add-on external PCB instead.

    For another project though I need to place an add-on PCB into a 14-pin DIL socket. The add-on board is equipped with a high wire-wrap IC socket. It equally well takes an IC as a wire-wrap socket, and now I want to replace that normal 14-pin DIL socket on the mainboard with one of those -but they're hard to find (outside of the US that is, unless I'm willing to pay for the rather high US shipping costs), so I'm wondering if those Arduino stacking headers will work the same way, allowing either wire wrap legs or normal 16-pin DIL ICs to be plugged into it?

    Here are a couple of photos of a normal IC socket I once replaced with one of those wire-wrap DIL sockets, somewhere else on the mainboard.
    20191129-130235_PB290015.jpg
    20191129-115233_PB290010.jpg
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-