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Motor Speed Controller

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by mattrgs, Oct 7, 2016.

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  1. mattrgs

    mattrgs

    3
    0
    Oct 7, 2016
    Hi all
    First of all thanks for any help.

    I have a 130V dc motor (1.34 kW) (see attached photo for more information) that I got out of a treadmill. I am using it in a homemade pottery wheels. However currently the controller out of the treadmill is complicated as it is computerised, so not easily changeable and modifications to it aren't possible. So therefore I am looking to fit a new motor controller.
    I don't need to run it at full speed, at absolute maximum it needs to be half speed, if not lower. I have found a number of devices such as this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B016Y027DM that I think would work with it. However all of these kinds of devices require a dc input.
    I have not managed to find a ac to dc converter that reaches a high enough voltage and power output. I am keen to keep this as cheap as possible, so am open to any suggestions.

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Minder

    Minder

    2,948
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    What you need is either one of the KB DC drives or a MC-60 T.M. motor controller.
    Both run direct off of the AC line, in UK with 230vac you will have to limit the rpm.
    so out of the two the KB has the 230v version.
    M.
     
  3. mattrgs

    mattrgs

    3
    0
    Oct 7, 2016
    Thanks for your reply.
    Whilst looking at similar projects, another solution came to mind:
    I only need to run the motor at 240 rpm max. Using this simple calculation I think it says I need a lot less voltage: (240/3400)*130 = 9.2V.
    Does this make sense, or do I need to take other things into account such as stalling the motor. I realise that at slow speeds I lose torque, but it is already very powerful, and if I were to use a 12 or 24V power supply I could run it slightly faster and use a pulley to decrease speed and increase torque.

    This seems like a simpler solution if it works.
     
  4. duke37

    duke37

    5,337
    753
    Jan 9, 2011
    What is the motor, there is a plethora of types.
    There should be no loss of torque at low speed but the motor may overheat due to less cooling.

    With a permanent magnet motor, the unloaded speed will be proportional to voltage. Some motors have strong cogging so they will not run sweetly at very low speeds and, at too low a voltage, they will come to an abrupt stop. A high inertia load will be beneficial.
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

    2,948
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    Leeson is a very high quality motor, you could try running it on a automotive battery to see how it performs at low voltage, but if using a SCR bridge controller it may buzz a little at low rpm, PWM is the smoothest, but they need a power supply as you noted, a bridge rectifier and a capacitor bank could be constructed to go across a suitable LV transformer.
    M.
     
  6. mattrgs

    mattrgs

    3
    0
    Oct 7, 2016
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