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Motion Sensors?

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by Need4Sleep, May 20, 2017.

  1. Need4Sleep

    Need4Sleep

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    May 20, 2017
    I was reading an article about stabilization of a spoon done with "motion sensors."
    I tried googling but I can't understand a thing. I'm really interested in doing some research on this spoon, but I don't get the crux itself.

    Can anyone please explain to me what are.. motion sensors? And also a bit of how do they work and exactly what work do they do (if possible)?
    I'll quote it here:
    "...contains a number of common motion sensors, the type that you might find in your iPhone or digital camera."

    I apologize if this is posted in the wrong section, I'm new.
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    link to article

    probably accelerometers

    again article link please
     
  3. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Need4Sleep and davenn like this.
  4. Need4Sleep

    Need4Sleep

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    May 20, 2017
    [Article]
    4th paragraph.
     
  5. garublador

    garublador

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    Oct 14, 2014
    They're most likely MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) accelerometers and/or gyroscopes. You can Google more now that you know what they're called, but here's one description of them:

    https://www.maximintegrated.com/en/app-notes/index.mvp/id/5830

    A microcontroller can use the data from these devices to tell how the spoon is moving.
     
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  6. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    The crux of it is adaptive learning algorithms that identify and separate ordinary human motions, such as moving the spoon from dish to mouth, from human tremor motions. Using MEMS accelerometers and MEMS rate gyroscopes the 3D orthogonal components of these motions can be digitized and processed by proprietary software. Once the tremor motions are identified, they can be subtracted out by two-degree-of-freedom orthogonal actuators attached to the "spoon" handle. The rate gyros provide a 3D space reference to accommodate wrist motions that rotate the "spoon" handle during normal movements and must be normalized to the actuator axes before the tremor motions are subtracted.

    The whole concept is a wonderful application of commercial "steady camera" (Steadicam) technology, which was invented for commercial use in 1975, although classified overhead imagery applications likely preceded it by at least a decade. Good luck on your research. And make sure you math skills are adequate to the task.
     
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  7. Need4Sleep

    Need4Sleep

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    May 20, 2017
    Thanks a ton! :-D
     
  8. Need4Sleep

    Need4Sleep

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    May 20, 2017
    Thank you so much for helping me out Hevans! Much respect! :')
     
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